Researchers discover bacteria thrive in zerogravity low nutrient environment

first_img P. aeruginosa, is one of the strains of bacteria responsible for urinary tract and other types of infections in people. The researchers chose it to study as a means of learning more about the ways bacteria that actually infect people might behave in a zero-gravity environment. Such research is important as space agencies contemplate longer missions at much farther distances.In this latest effort, the researchers added the bacteria to several containers of simulated urine that were put aboard one of the last Shuttle missions—each with a different mix of nutrients and amount of bacteria. Astronauts aboard the shuttle were able to monitor bacterial growth as were researchers on the team after the samples were brought back home.In analyzing the results, the researchers found that after 72 hours when fed an abundance of nutrients P. aeruginosa concentrations in space were nearly identical to those of Earth-bound samples. But, when the nutrients were greatly reduced, the researchers found that the bacteria in space kept up the same pace—concentrations of the bacteria were nearly the same as those that had been given a lot of nutrients. Those bacteria in the lab back on Earth, on the other hand, when fed the same small amount, showed far less growth. The study indicates that scientists designing systems to protect future astronauts against bacterial infections, headed for places like Mars, may have their hands full. P. aeruginosais is a type of bacteria that could very easily infect human waste processing systems. Also getting rid of such colonies would be difficult as they are notoriously difficult to eradicate here on Earth. Now that it’s known they can thrive with even fewer available nutrients, the problem becomes even harder to solve. Citation: Researchers discover bacteria thrive in zero-gravity low nutrient environment (2013, November 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-bacteria-zero-gravity-nutrient-environment.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Spaceflight alters bacterial social networks Journal information: BMC Microbiology More information: Effect of spaceflight on Pseudomonas aeruginosa final cell density is modulated by nutrient and oxygen availability, BMC Microbiology 2013, 13:241. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2180-13-241center_img Explore further © 2013 Phys.org Credit: BMC Microbiology 2013, 13:241. doi:10.1186/1471-2180-13-241 (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in New York, working with Lockheed-Martin Ames Research Center has found that one strain of a common type of bacteria thrives aboard space vehicles, even when faced with minimal nutrients. In their paper published in BMC Microbiology, the researchers describe an experiment they conducted aboard NASA Shuttle Atlantis that showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a very common type of bacteria, grows more dense cultures when in space than it does on Earth when available nutrients are restricted.last_img read more

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Research team claims to have accurately teleported quantum information ten feet

first_imgThe research team next plans to extend the distance between the qubits to 1,300 meters, while others presumably will attempt to replicate the first result—if the claims prove true, the breakthrough could mark the first stage of a the development of a true quantum computer, or network. More information: Unconditional quantum teleportation between distant solid-state quantum bits, Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1253512ABSTRACTRealizing robust quantum information transfer between long-lived qubit registers is a key challenge for quantum information science and technology. Here, we demonstrate unconditional teleportation of arbitrary quantum states between diamond spin qubits separated by 3 m. We prepare the teleporter through photon-mediated heralded entanglement between two distant electron spins and subsequently encode the source qubit in a single nuclear spin. By realizing a fully deterministic Bell-state measurement combined with real-time feed-forward quantum teleportation is achieved upon each attempt with an average state fidelity exceeding the classical limit. These results establish diamond spin qubits as a prime candidate for the realization of quantum networks for quantum communication and network-based quantum computing.Ronald Hanson Lab: hansonlab.tudelft.nl/Press release: phys.org/wire-news/162888651/beam-me-up-data.html Explore further (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Delft University in the Netherlands is reporting in a paper they have had published in the journal Science, that they have successfully used entanglement as a means of communication, over a distance of ten feet (three meters). Furthermore, they note, they did so with 100 percent reliability and without altering the spin state of the quantum bits (qubits) involved. Artistic impression of quantum teleportation of a spin state between two distant diamonds. Teleportation, is of course, a means of moving an object from one place to another without it having to travel between them. Thus far examples of it have only been seen in science fiction movies. The idea of moving information in similar fashion, however, has met with some, albeit limited success. The idea is to use the concept of entanglement of particles as a means of conveyance. It’s supposed to work because of the strange interconnectedness of the two particles—whatever happens to one, automatically happens to the other, regardless of the distance between them. Such a property should allow then, for the exchange of information. If the spin state of one qubit is altered, then it should be automatically altered in the other qubit—a form of information exchange which can be counted as a message of sorts if a string of such transactions can be carried out.To date, scientists have struggled to use entanglement as a means of communication—it’s been achieved but the error rate has been so great that it would be unfeasible as a real-world application. In this new effort, the researchers claim to have solved the error rate problem—they’ve brought it down to zero percent. They did it, they report, by trapping electrons in diamonds at very low temperatures and shooting them with lasers, resulting in the creation of qubits. The diamonds, the team reports, serve as really tiny prisons, holding the electrons in place. Held as they were, the researchers were able to cause a spin state to exist and then to read it at both locations, which meant that information had been conveyed. © 2014 Phys.orgcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Research team claims to have accurately ‘teleported’ quantum information ten feet (2014, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-team-accurately-teleported-quantum-ten.html This image is an electron microscope picture of one of the two devices, with a fictitious teleportation beam added. The image is about 40 micrometer wide in reality. ‘Quantum Internet’: Towards realization of solid-state quantum network Journal information: Sciencelast_img read more

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Superhenge turns out to be giant circle of chalkfilled post holes

first_img © 2016 Phys.org Explore further Citation: Superhenge turns out to be giant circle of chalk-filled post holes (2016, August 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-superhenge-giant-circle-chalk-filled-holes.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Stonehenge archeologists find huge neolithic sitecenter_img The excavation is part of the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, which is seeking to better explain the nature of Stonehenge by digging up and studying other parts of the landscape that may contain other structures or artifacts from the same time period. Last year, a study was made of Durrington Walls, a monument approximately two miles from Stonehenge. Today, it exists as a semi-circular mound (approximately 1,640 feet across) of chalk and dirt with a ditch situated just next to it. Radar guns suggested 200 to 300 anomalies beneath the ground at regular intervals which archeologists believed were likely long, tall stones buried below. But now that the team has dug out two of the anomalies, they have discovered that the radar was picking up columns of chalk blocks sitting in five-foot-deep holes that they now believe were once used to keep wood posts upright in the ground. Both holes also had a shallow connecting hole that is believed to have been used to help steady the pole in the ground. At the bottom of one of the holes, the researchers found the remains of a cow shoulder blade that had been fashioned into a primitive shovel.The researchers now theorize that the site was intended to be used for conducting unknown types of rituals, but was never finished—instead, the posts that had been laid were pulled from the ground and were filled in with blocks of chalk and then the whole site was covered over with dirt and chalk bits, as if attempting to remove its existence from the landscape. They suggest it appears likely a change occurred, either in religious or political leanings, or a new group of people came in, took over, and then sought to remove evidence of the structure. Stonehenge. Image: Wikipedia. A team of researchers working at a site near Stonehenge made headlines last year when they conducted radar tests on a 4,500-year-old monument called Durrington Walls. They reported that they had found evidence of a circle of buried stones that was much larger than Stonehenge, leading to the nickname Superhenge. Now, after excavating two of the locations thought to contain stones, the team is reporting that they are not stones at all, but are instead holes in the ground that once held wooden posts but which are now filled with small blocks of chalk.last_img read more

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Bomblike object sends EW Metro workers into tizzy

first_imgKolkata: Workers carrying out construction work at the proposed East West Metro project stumbled upon something that resembled a bomb, near the proposed site of Subhas Sarovar Metro station on EM Bypass on Sunday morning. The bomb was recovered from a place on the western side of the proposed station, where tracks are being laid for running of rakes.The labourers working at the site informed their seniors, who contacted the Phoolbagan police station. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsWithin a few minutes, a police team reached the spot and informed the bomb squad of Kolkata Police. The officials from the bomb squad, along with a sniffer dog, was pressed into service and the object was defused.”The bomb had gun powder and splinters in it and if it had exploded, then things could have been worse,” a worker involved with the construction work of the Metro project said. Engineers from Kolkata Metro Railway Corporation Ltd (KMRCL), the implementing agency of the EW Metro project, also visited the spot. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed”We have informed the police and they are investigating the matter. Work has resumed at the site,” said Biswanath Dewanjee, Chief Engineer (Civil) of KMRCL.Sleuths who recovered the object, said that it was a bomb shell and the gun powder inside it was not strong enough to cause any explosion or injure anybody.”We are trying to find out how it reached the place,” an investigating officer from Phoolbagan police station said, who seized the object after it was defused.last_img read more

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6 Trinamool workers killed several injured

first_imgKolkata: Six Trinamool Congress workers were killed and several were left injured when attacked by supporters of the Opposition political parties on the day of the Panchayat polls on Monday. It may be mentioned that 14 Trinamool Congress workers were killed during pre-poll clashes and on the day of the election, supporters and workers of the party were attacked at different parts of the state.Partha Chatterjee, Secretary General of Trinamool Congress, said workers and supporters of the party all across the state have shown tremendous endurance despite facing gruesome aggression. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights”Most of the people killed on Monday were workers of the Trinamool Congress. Six TMC workers were killed,” he said.It was a few hours after the poll had started that a Trinamool Congress worker raised his voice finding attempts of rigging at a polling booth at Meriganj near Kultali in South 24-Parganas. The allegation was made against the CPI(M) that they have killed the Trinamool Congress worker, identified as Arif Ali Gazi. He was shot dead from a point-blank range. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe incident led to tension in the area. Police went to the spot and brought the situation under control. Locals protested against the incident and demanded immediate arrest of the accused.Another worker of the party — Sanjit Pramanik was killed at Shantipur in Nadia. Sanjit was an MA student and was beaten up mercilessly along with two of his friends. Before he could have understood anything, several people began beating them up. They continued thrashing him up till he fell on the ground. Even bombs were hurled at him. Police went to the spot and took them to Shantipur State General Hospital where Sanjit succumbed to his injuries. The miscreants hurled bombs to flee the area realising that they would get caught as police were approaching the spot.Bhola Tapadar, a TMC worker, was shot dead at Nakashipara in Nadia. He was taken on to the terrace of a house when he was returning after giving his vote and he was shot dead from a point blank range. The victim’s family members alleged that CPI(M) workers were behind the murder of Bhola.In another incident, Krishnapada Sarkar was killed at Tehatta in Nadia during a clash that broke out near a polling station in the area. Police picket has been posted in the area to ensure that law and order situation doesn’t deteriorate in the area.Moreover, several Trinamool Congress workers suffered injuries as well.last_img read more

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Of wilderness and abstractions

first_imgCurated by Kiran Pundir and Artsaroma, Beanstalk is holding a solo show, titled Flow of Life by artist Nandini Verma. Through her work, Verma, who hails from Chattisgarh traces her roots back to the place, where semi-arid jungles, native tribes, rural rustic villages, industrial suburbs and small towns create a landscape full of colours, culture and life. She says: “This vivid canvas of life kindled my curiosity and drew me into exploration of various arts and crafts to capture it. I started experimenting with various abstractions, while enjoying ethnic and folk painting inspired by the nature and culture of Chhattisgarh. Painting semi-abstract depiction of themes, colours and textures fascinate me the most.” She further adds: “I am actively exploring the interplay of nature and influence of human settlement because this is the most critical issue that I’m confronted with all the time”.last_img read more

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Fasting diet can help you stay sharp and slim

first_imgIf you find it hard to stick to strict fasting, don’t worry. Following for just five days in three months a diet that mimics fasting can help you lose fat, get smarter and live longer, says a study.The three-tiered study on periodic fasting’s effects was published in the journal Cell Metabolism.Cycles of a four-day low-calorie diet that mimics fasting (FMD) cut visceral belly fat and elevated the number of progenitor and stem cells in several organs of old mice — including the brain, where it boosted neural regeneration and improved learning and memory. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In the pilot human trial, three cycles of a similar diet given to 19 participants once a month for five days decreased risk factors and biomarkers for ageing, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer with no major adverse side effects, said study author Valter Longo, professor at University of Southern California Davis School of Gerontology in the US.”Strict fasting is hard for people to stick to and it can also be dangerous, so we developed a complex diet that triggers the same effects in the body,” Longo said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe diet slashed the individual’s caloric intake down to 34 to 54 percent of normal, with a specific composition of proteins, carbohydrates, fats and micronutrients.It decreased amounts of the hormone IGFBP-I, which is required during development to grow, but it is a promoter of ageing and has been linked to cancer susceptibility.It also increased the amount of the hormone IGFBP and reduced biomarkers/risk factors linked to diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including glucose, trunk fat and C-reactive protein without negatively affecting muscle and bone mass. For 25 days a month, study participants went back to their regular eating habits — good or bad — once they finished the treatment.They were not asked to change their diet and still saw positive changes, the study said.Longo believes that for most normal people, the FMD can be done every three to six months, depending on the abdominal circumference and health status.last_img read more

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Centres decision to conduct online NEET will deprive many City doctors

first_imgKolkata: The Center’s decision to conduct nationwide medical entrance examination twice a year by the National Testing Agency (NTA) will deprive the meritorious medical aspirants from far flung districts in the state as the exam would be conducted online only at various centers in the city, feel a section of the city doctors.According to the doctors, the new method of examination lacks transparency and the students have to pay a hefty amount which would be difficult for the poor candidates. Union HRD minister Prakash Javadekar earlier said a medical aspirant can take the exam two times a year and the best score will be taken into consideration for admission in the undergraduate course. NEET undergraduate level exam is scheduled to be held in February and May 2019. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedNTA will replace the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) that has been organising National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) on behalf of the Medical Council of India and the Health Ministry. The medical entrance examination conducted by the NTA will be a computer-based online examination. According to the minister, the method of examination will check irregularities in the examination, leakage in the question paper.A section of the city doctors, however, feel otherwise as they have pointed out some flaws in the examination when it is conducted by the NTA. According to them, online NEET is not possible and till now no medical or engineering online examinations have taken place in multi language. The minister, however, said they conduct the online exam in multi-language. According to Dr AK Maity, an expert in the field of medical education said the students have to pay Rs 1400 twice for appearing in the examinations. Earlier, students from the state had to pay Rs 400-500 for the same when it was conducted by the state government. The candidates from the rural areas have to come to Kolkata from far off districts only to appear for the online exam, which is not possible for a section of students. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPStudents will not be able to bring out the question paper and it can’t be made public. As a result, candidates will not get to know how many mistakes they had committed during the exam. “The new method of examination will invite more irregularities in the examination. It was found through various incidents that there is always a possibility of corruption in the method of online examinations. There is also a possibility of scientific irregularities,” said Dr Maity.last_img read more

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Soon new arboretum for mangrove species of Sunderbans

first_imgKolkata: State Forest department is coming up with a new arboretum for showcasing the wide variety of mangrove plants that exist in the Sunderbans. The arboretum will come up adjacent to Sudhanyakhali Watch Tower, which is deemed as a prime location for wildlife spotting.”There are around 54 species of mangroves among which 34 species are found in the Sunderbans. No other mangrove forest in the country has so many species of mangrove as the Sunderbans Biosphere Reserve. We feel that the tourists, who visit the Sunderbans, will be interested in gaining knowledge about the mangrove variety,” a senior official of SBR said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe official further said they will take the help of the Botanical Survey of India (BSI) for the purpose of labelling the species of mangroves.The state Forest department also has plans to develop its existing arboretum at Bakkhali to make it more interesting for the tourists.The department has also taken up a study of the socio economic impact of the various schemes undertaken by them for the upliftment of the village folk in the Sunderbans.We have 65 Joint Forest Management Committee (JMFC), which work for developing the social and economic condition of the people living there, through different schemes. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed”They have taken up activities like creating irrigation channels, brick paths, pond jetties, Self-Help groups, piggery, goat rearing, poultry etc. The study will assess the impact of the work of the JFMC’s and accordingly plan the future course of action that is to be undertaken,” a senior official of the Forest department said.The department hopes to complete the study by March 2019 and come up with a report in April.The study will be carried out by a team of experts from prominent educational institutes in the country, who are adept in such impact study.last_img read more

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TMC Panchayat member injured in scuffle with youth

first_imgKolkata: A Trinamool Congress Panchayat member sustained injuries after being beaten up by a youth who was later arrested by Bidhannagar police.The incident took place near Unitech More in New Town on Thursday morning. Police said that the victim Akhtar Gazi, also known as Tutun, is a Panchayat member of Baliguri. He was passing near Unitech gate number 1 in his car, when the accused youth, Rajib Majumdar, an IT employee who was riding his motorcycle, hit the vehicle. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeAccording to the police, the accused youth was riding the motorcycle at a high speed, as a result of which he lost control over the vehicle. After his bike hit the car, Majumdar hurled expletives at the driver of the car. As the Panchayat member protested against the incident, the accused engaged in a heated altercation with him. Majumdar allegedly beat up the Panchayat member and also snatched the key of his car. The accused tried to flee with the key following the incident. Some traffic police officers who were there in the nearby areas, chased the accused and managed to catch hold of him. He was brought to the local police station. The police recovered the key of the Panchayat member’s car. After a brief interrogation, the accused was arrested by Bidhannagar police on various charges.last_img read more

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