SA to host women’s cricket challenge

first_imgLocal cricketer Olivia Anderson is making a name for herself in England. (Image: Cricinfo) South Africa was recently chosen to host the inaugural ICC Women’s Cricket Challenge, which will take place in Potchefstroom, North West province, from 6 to 16 October 2010.The tournament will be played under the auspices of the International Cricket Council (ICC), with Cricket South Africa (CSA) as the official host.According to the ICC, the challenge will take the form of all-women teams, currently ranked between fifth and 10th in the world, competing in a series of one day intenational (ODI) and Twenty20 fixtures. Countries in the line-up are South Africa, the Netherlands, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Ireland.“This tournament is an ideal way for the women’s teams ranked outside of the top four to gain more match experience in both ODI and Twenty20 formats,” ICC global development manager Matthew Kennedy said in a statement.The first round of the challenge will consist of ODIs, while the spectators’ favourite – the Twenty20 games – will begin on 14 October. Most of the matches will be played at the North West University’s Potchefstroom campus.It’s hoped the October competition will shake up women’s ODI rankings and enable some of the competing countries to qualify for the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup to be played in India in 2013.“The tournament will also provide a good challenge for all six competing teams, as none of them has yet qualified for the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup,” Kennedy said.The top-four women ODI teams – England, New Zealand, India and defending champions Australia – have already qualified for the World Cup, which features eight nations.South Africa participated in the 2009 World Cup held in Australia, and hosted it in 2005.The country’s female players are expected to perform well in the African qualifier games, which will wrap up in December 2010.The final international qualifiers, to be held in Bangladesh in November 2011, will see 10 nations battle it out for the four remaining World Cup spots.SA women on a good wicketSouth Africa’s first national women’s cricket squad was selected in 1997 and since then the country taken bold steps to develop the sport for females – this includes setting up the Cricket South Africa Women’s Cricket Committee.Women’s cricket gained further momentum in South Africa at the start of the millennium when competitions such as the interprovincial league were initiated. In the early 2000s more than 9 000 females from 1 109 schools and 269 clubs were playing cricket, according to CSA.Local batswoman Olivia Anderson, who debuted for South Africa in 2008, is currently making a name for herself in the UK playing for Shepperton Cricket Club. She’s racked up 1 000 runs this season, after scoring 76 off 66 balls in a match against Purley Redoubtables on 8 August.Although the final player selections for the October challenge have yet to be announced, Anderson is one of the favourites for the South African squad.last_img read more

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Springbok Women into final World Cup preparations

first_img15 July 2014The Springbok Women began finalising their preparations for next month’s IRB Women’s Rugby World Cup on Monday as the squad assembled in Cape Town for their World Cup holding camp.All 26 players named in the South African Rugby World Cup squad reported for duty, including Springbok Women’s captain Mandisa Williams, who was withdrawn from their warm-up tour of England and France due to a knee injury, and centres Marithy Pienaar and Ziyanda Tywaleni, who missed the tour due to knee and hamstring injuries respectively.The World Cup will be hosted in Marcoussis, outside of Paris, from 1 to 17 August, with the Springbok Women set to face Australia, France and Wales in the pool stages.‘Pleasing’Springbok Women’s coach Lawrence Sephaka was pleased to welcome back his players for their final training camp and said: “It is good to have the team back together and it is pleasing to see the players fresh and ready for the big challenge that lies ahead.“It is also satisfying to welcome Marithy and Ziyanda to the squad following their injury layoffs.“The team realises that this is the last chance to work on the big things before the World Cup and they are all in the right frame of mind to achieve this.”Training goalsSephaka said one of his main main goals before the team departs for France is to work on the areas of their game that let them down against the Nomads and France.“We took several positives from our warm-up tour, particularly our defence and ability to score tries against the Nomads, and our encouraging performance all around in the second half against France,” said Sephaka. “But there are areas we have to work on, which includes converting the pressure on attack into points and improving our scrummaging, so we have hard work ahead in the next two weeks.”The Springbok squad will have a World Cup capping ceremony and send-off function on the eve of their departure on 26 July at The Garden Court, Nelson Mandela Boulevard.Springbok Women’s Rugby World Cup squadForwards: Celeste Adonis (Western Province), Nolusindiso Booi (Border), Nomathamsanqa Faleni (Eastern Province), Rachelle Geldenhuys (Blue Bulls), Portia Jonga (Eastern Province), Cebisa Kula (Eastern Province), Thantaswa Macingwana (Border), Lamla Momoti (Border), Nwabisa Ngxatu (Border), Asithandile Ntoyanto (Border), Vuyolwethu Vazi (Blue Bulls), Denita Wentzel (Western Province), Shona-Leah Weston (Blue Bulls), Mandisa Williams (Border, captain). Backs: Siviwe Basweni (Border), Lorinda Brown (Eastern Province), Cindy Cant (Blue Bulls), Phumeza Gadu (Eastern Province), Veroeshka Grain (Western Province), Zenay Jordaan (Border), Tayla Kinsey (KwaZulu-Natal), Benele Makwezela (Western Province), Fundiswa Plaatjie (Border), Marithy Pienaar (Blue Bulls), Siphosethu Tshingana (Eastern Province), Ziyanda Tywaleni (Border).Springbok Women’s 2014 WRWC Pool FixturesFriday, 1 Aug: SA vs Australia, MarcoussisTuesday, 5 Aug: SA vs France, MarcoussisSaturday, 9 Aug: SA vs Wales, MarcoussisSAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Is the TV Channel Dead?

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market According to Toeman, the current broadcast infrastructure is set up to support all 110,000,000 households in the US watching the same content at once, in real-time. But for if every individual wanted to have different content streamed to them on their own schedule, there’s nothing in place that can support that.“Let‚Äôs say that at any given time, all 110MM households want to watch a recent episode of a show (say, last week‚Äôs Heroes). Best method possible? Give them all DVRs, use the broadcast pipe to get it to the house, let them watch it time-shifted however they‚Äôd like.But now let‚Äôs say that all 110MM households want to watch radically different content, such as the episode of The Facts of Life where Blair learns a very important lesson, or that very special Blossom. Then, having access to a personalized, on-demand IP network is ideal. It‚Äôs costly to build, costly to maintain, and time-consuming to construct (not to mention dealing with the graphical user interface complexities), but it‚Äôs the right model.”The technical specifics are probably a bit over my head (and I’m not totally sure on demand has to be done over IP), but as last100 reported earlier today, ISPs are seething over IPTV projects like the BBC’s iPlayer in the UK. Their networks simply can’t support the strain.That said, I think the answer to the Techdirt question is that yes, the notion of a TV channel is a dying. It’s certainly not dead yet, but the increasing popularity of web video and the “on demand” nature of the Internet will force television networks to begin rethinking their delivery methods and eventually upgrade their networks to be able to handle completely on demand services.What do you think? Is the the concept of a TV channel going out the window? What do you think the future of TV will look like? Tags:#Analysis#web josh catone 1 This morning Techdirt posed an interesting question: is there any need for the concept of a TV channel anymore? With the rise of TiVo, which allows users to watch time-shifted content on their schedule, downloading, which lets people download television shows (not always legally) whenever they want, and now IPTV (like Joost), the traditional channel model may be falling by the wayside.As Techdirt notes, the idea that the channel is an outmoded format is gaining steam, “especially in the UK, where some are wondering why they should wait many months for American TV shows to show up on UK TV when they can (or will soon be able to) simply watch the shows online at the same time everyone else can.”During an OSX vs. Vista debate on the ScobleShow last January, there was an interesting tangent in which the participants, particularly Fred Davis and Jeremy Toeman, debated the merits of IPTV vs. the traditional broadcast model.I’ve long envisioned a future television landscape where shows are “released” at a certain date (akin to air times on the current set up), but people could stream them whenever they want, paying a la carte for only the shows they want to watch — perhaps subscribing to an entire season for a reduced fee. Unfortunately, the infrastructure for such a future simply does not exist yet. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Offender Perspectives on Self-Checkout Theft

first_imgThe convenience of self-checkout has made the service increasingly popular among customers in recent years. Retailers also take advantage of the self-checkout technology to reduce labor costs and speed up the checkout process.Unfortunately, this convenient option is popular among genuine customers and fraudsters alike.The seemingly easy process presents many fraud-related vulnerabilities and can impact the bottom line of many retail businesses. Problems like sweethearting, tag-switching, and operational losses can be difficult to detect if retailers don’t adequately supervise the area with associates and technologies.- Sponsor – Through interviews with dozens of shoplifters with recent self-checkout theft experiences, I explored their shoplifting behaviors, methods, and the thought process behind why they chose to leverage this method to conduct theft. In addition, I investigated the impact of self-checkout associates and how their engagement with the customers would impact the shoplifting experience of offenders.Why Self-Checkout Theft?The main reason offenders leverage this theft option is because they felt self-checkout theft is easier to get away with, either through prior experiences or established rationales.There are several contributing factors to why offenders believe self-checkout theft is easier to get away with. Almost all offenders I interviewed indicated they use self-checkout for shoplifting because they receive less attention from both employees and other customers.Some offenders indicated that if they ever got caught, they could always say they’d accidentally or inadvertently took the items, been distracted during checkout, or misused the technology due to its complexity. Furthermore, several offenders are under the impression that self-checkout theft is harder to prosecute because it’s hard to prove the intent behind the taking of unpaid items. The psychology behind shoplifting using a machine is rather interesting; some offenders confessed that because they are interacting with a machine rather than a human being, psychologically, they felt less guilty about stealing.During the interviews, I explored the reasons why some offenders target specific stores. Some feedback is rather sedentary and cannot be acted on, such as the omnipresence and proximity of the brand, size of the store, or the variety of products a retail chain carries. However, many offenders identified lack of employee oversight as the biggest opportunity retailers can act upon to reduce theft opportunities at self-checkouts. In addition, some offenders reported that outdate technologies and lack of consequences for shoplifting can precipitate more shoplifting incidents.Role of EmployeesWhen asked to identify loss prevention technologies in the self-checkout areas, many offenders interviewed recognized the associates as a deterrent before perceiving the surrounding technologies. Some offenders even reported that an attentive self-checkout associate is more effective at deterring theft than advanced technologies. Needless to say, self-checkout associates play a crucial role in deterring shoplifting.One offender even commented on the importance of an attentive associate in deterring shoplifting: “A lot of stealing got by because of lazy employees—employees are not paying attention, or are on their phones. It’s all about the employees. If the store has employees who are more attentive, then self-checkout theft would be hard.”As previously mentioned, a majority of the offenders admitted to intentionally using self-checkout services to avoid employee oversight. Therefore, increased associate supervision at self-checkout areas can help a store mitigate theft.However, there is a fine balance between the level of engagement associates should provide and its effectiveness in deterring shoplifting. In general, there are two categories of thoughts from the offenders. On one hand, some offenders suggested that employee engagement and assistance during the checkout process would discourage from stealing.Offender 2 said: “Employee engagement would deter me from stealing because that kind of lets me know that I’m being watched. Even if they just say, ‘Is there something I could help you with?’ or ‘Do you need any help today?’ It’s a lot easier to shoplift from a store when employees are not as engaging.”On the other hand, some offenders suggested that self-checkout associates do not necessarily have to be engaging to deter shoplifters; rather, they just need to be aware of the overall checkout process. As a matter of fact, these offenders even indicated it might be helpful if the employee is simply overseeing the area, rather than engaging with customers, as some offenders intentionally wait for moments when employees are assisting other customers so that they may shoplift without the risk of drawing attention.Offender 3 said: “You have an extra set of eyes on you, so you’re less likely to slide an item covered by another item.”Regardless of level of engagement the self-checkout associates seek to provide, the main force of deterrence is attentive self-checkout associates who pay attention to customers and their surroundings. Moreover, employee training can be crucial in combating self-checkout theft. Educating associates on suspicious activities and red flags indicators and then engage with the would-be shoplifters could enhance the overall effectiveness of customer service at self-checkout.The LPRC continue to help retailers shaping strategies to maximize convenience minimizing costs and losses through the SmartCheckout Centers of Excellence.Check out the video below to see clips from actual offender interviewers. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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A Brief Convo on The Economists Snapchat

first_imgThe Economist has moved onto Snapchat, using quick, sharp storytelling in an attempt to woo an audience of Millennials. This is the latest launch in the brand’s “Read, Watch, and Listen” strategy, through which The Economist content is distributed to new channels. For us it just makes sense to be where we think an audience that would enjoy The Economist would be. You can’t deny the power of Snapchat as a content distribution platform. And you can’t deny the power of the Snapchat Generation. Lydia Kaldas: It’s a really important platform for us to join, and we joined it in the way we join anything — by adapting our content to the platform and the audience, and really making people discover the brand. Hopefully we surprise them in a positive manner. Folio: The brand promises to bring “mind-stretching journalism” to Discover. How does this content strategy differ from what someone might find in the magazine or on other digital channels? Kaldas: The core itself is not really different. We remain true to our beliefs and what they stand for. There isn’t really a difference from what we publish, whether it is in newspaper, the digital editions or Espresso; it is The Economist and The Economist content and The Economist voice, just adapted to the platform. To find out more, we sat down for a brief conversation with Lydia Kaldas, The Economist’s SVP of strategy and channel relationships. Kaldas: Our largest audience is in North America, but when you look at the potential of what would be The Economist audience — the globally curious, as we like to call them — we still have a misconception of the brand. We carry a name that is very strong and most people think that we are only about business, and economics, and finance. But that’s only a small percentage of what we cover. It doesn’t differ from the strategy from a content perspective, it just differs from the format. The stories that are on Snapchat have published already in our newspaper, digital editions, or through The Economist films. So the substance can fit on a multitude of platforms.center_img So a platform like Snapchat is a fantastic medium to showcase our content in a much more dynamic way and speak to an audience that is very globally curious, is very educated, and is really interested in content and information. Kaldas: No, it’s more about content distribution. “Acquisition,” in the sense of subscriptions, isn’t really valid in this case. So if you’re talking about acquisition of new audience, then I would say, yes. This really is the first step in gaining a new audience — an audience that is on the younger side, which we call the “Snapchat Generation.” Folio: The Economist just joined Snapchat Discover. Why bring the brand onto this new medium? While the brand has been successful with older audiences through the launch of The Economist Espresso app, it’s yet to be seen how a younger audience takes the brands’ weekend-only, 14-card news reports. Folio: So this an audience acquisition strategy? We still have a brand awareness challenge when it comes to North America, and I think this is really the perfect platform to showcase our content and how interesting we are.A promotional video shows an example of a card from The Economist Snapchat story. Folio: What is the challenge with North America?last_img read more

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Study to Consider Possible Land Use Conflicts with Maxwell AFB

first_imgMaxwell Air Force Base is not experiencing any significant encroachment issues from the surrounding region, but with recent growth in downtown Montgomery, Ala., city leaders want to ensure land use conflicts jeopardizing the installation don’t emerge in the coming decades.“We don’t want to have anything negatively impacting the mission of Maxwell and the Air Force, especially with the economic development we’ve been having in the downtown area,” Robert Smith, director of city planning, told the Montgomery Advertiser.To prepare for further growth in the River Region and uncover possible compatibility issues, Montgomery, Prattville and Montgomery County are partnering with Maxwell and to conduct a joint land use study. Matrix Design Group introduced the study to local residents at public meeting last week.The study, partially funded by DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment, will look at dozens of compatibility issues, including several conflicts that could arise in the future. The possibility that the Air National Guard’s 187th Fighter Wing moves from Montgomery Regional Airport to Maxwell could lead to noise conflicts if the unit starts flying the F-35. The study also will consider the prospect that frequency interference stemming from Montgomery’s aim to become a “gig city” with the state’s first internet exchange affects Air Force activities.Matrix, which has conducted 130 similar studies since 2005, will look at Maxwell and its Gunter Annex separately because of their geography and diverse missions, according to the story.The easiest way to avoid conflicts between the military and its civilian hosts is for both sides to communicate and coordinate their activities, said Mike Hrapla, the study’s project manager. “About 85 percent of compatibility issues can be resolved by sharing information,” Hrapla said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB The Best Stories From Wilmingtons Newspapers

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are recent articles about Wilmington — published online between February 18, 2019 to February 24, 2019 — that residents should consider reading:Wilmington Town CrierWilmington looking to hire veterans/seniors case worker by Lizzy HillFY20 school calendar not ready yet by Lizzie McDermottSchool Committee to have subcommittee discuss employment contract posting by Lizzie McDermottTwo Men and a Truck Mother’s Day campaign by Lizzy HillWilmington Town Crier sports stories can be read HERE.Wilmington AdvocateNoneWilmington PatchNoneLowell SunNew owners pay $3.25M for ice rink by Kori TuittLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”last_img read more

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Prof Golam Rabbani new proctor of DU

first_imgProfessor Golam Rabbani.Professor AKM Golam Rabbani of Islamic History & Culture department has been appointed as the new proctor of Dhaka University (DU) on Thursday.The new proctor will take charge on 22 October, DU vice-chancellor Akhtaruzzaman told UNB.last_img

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Public money spent on dev propaganda ahead of polls

first_imgWith the elections around the bend, the government will be apprising the people of the rural areas about its achievements in the development sector over the past several years. And, as usual, public money will be used for the purpose.As part of this campaign, the directorate of mass communication, under the information ministry, has taken up a project for strengthening publicity for the development of rural communities, at a cost of around Tk 600 million. The Executive Committee of the National Economic Council (ECNEC) approved the project on 3 April.This project includes campaigning on the development achievements of the government over the last few years, aimed at giving the ruling party an upper hand in the election race. Under the project videos on development will be projected in every union. This will be accompanied by concerts, women’s meetings and free meals.Director of the mass communication directorate Jasim Uddin has said the project will be implemented fully from July.The main programme is entitled ‘Egiye Jachhe Bangladesh’ (Bangladesh is advancing).The 10 initiatives of the prime minister being highlighted under the project are ‘Ekti Bari Ekti Khamar’ (one farm for every household), Asrayan, Digital Bangladesh, education assistance programme, electricity for all, community clinics and child development, social security and more.Achievements of the government at home and abroad over the last eight years will also be highlighted in the campaign through film shows, folksong sessions, women gatherings, Facebook posts, YouTube, as well as radio and TV broadcasts.The project is of three years, spanning from November 2017 to November 2020. According to the project documents, Tk 535 million or 90 per cent of the total budget will be spent between 2 and 19 of June.Commenting on the relevance of the project, former advisor of the caretaker government AB Mirza Azizul Islam said there is no justified basis for such projects. No development is achieved through such projects. He added, such projects are taken up with the election in mind, to win votes from the people.Taking up projects before the polls is nothing new.In the current fiscal, three projects have been passed for constructing schools, colleges, mosques and temples, according to the demand of the concerned MPs. Three more such projects are in the pipeline, awaiting allocations for constructing madrasas, public toilets and market places in other relevant constituencies.The MPs of these constituencies had been allocated Tk 30 million to 50 million for road construction in their areas over the last eight years. The development campaign project is the latest inclusion.Films on the development of every union will be presented. A thousand leaflets on development will be distributed and over four and a half million leaflets will be printed at a cost of Tk 100 million.Jasim Uddin went on to say, before the commencement of the project, appointments will be made, premises will be rented and other preparations will be completed.LED screens will be set up on pickup trucks in each of the 4,554 unions to screen the films.A school compound from each union will be selected for the film shows. And 20 teams will be employed to screen the films across the country. Every day at least one show will be held, at least 20 shows in each district per month.In all, 21,360 shows will be screened. Five films costing Tk 100,000 each will be produced. Two-thirds of the total budget, that is Tk 380 million, has been allocated for this purpose.Local popular folk music like bhawaiya, gombhira, jari-sari will also be performed.A total of 9,792 events will be held across the country. The events will cost Tk 20 million. Each of the folk singer will be paid Tk 700 per programme, bringing the total cost to Tk 30 million for this segment.A woman gathering will be held at each upazila. Budget for the banner, stage decoration, participators is Tk 15,000.And those watching the development campaign films will be treated to good food, with Tk 20 million allocated for their treat.AB Mirza Azizul Islam said, people can see development for themselves if it takes place. It doesn’t require further campaigning. Moreover, there is the TV and the radio for broadcasting development. Local leaders involved with the ruling party will benefit from this project, he observed.*This report, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Nusrat Nowrin.last_img read more

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