“I am Walt Disney” – New Book and Giveaway

first_imgShare This!If you’ve got young readers, you’ve probably heard of the Ordinary People Change the World books by Brad Meltzer and Chris Eliopoulos. The newest book in the series is I am Walt Disney, and it’s out now in hardcover and Kindle formats. It makes a great birthday or holiday gift.The story traces Walt’s life from Marceline, Missouri, through the creation of Mickey Mouse, to the opening of Disneyland and Cal Arts. It highlights how Walt’s hard work, imagination, and kindness, helped create the movies and theme parks we all love. It’s a great message for young children, because it shows those how those traits can make the world a better place.One of my favorite things about the book is that every image of Walt includes his mustache, even as a child:Disney theme park fans will see shout-outs to famous Imagineers including Rolly Crump and Mary Blair:I’ve known Chris for a long time. Not only is he a talented illustrator, he’s a huge Disney theme parks fan, and a great guy. Plus, his work ethic is incredible. Besides the Ordinary People series, Chris is working with Brad on a new television series for PBS Kids, titled Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum, starting on November 12. To celebrate the release of this book, we’re giving away a copy of this book to FOUR lucky winners. To enter, simply comment here on the blog, reply to our post on Twitter, like and tag a friend in our post on Instagram, or comment on our Facebook post. One winner will be selected on each platform by a random draw from entries submitted by Sunday, September 22, 2019 at 11:59 p.m. ET. Winners will be contacted by email or social media direct message and need to provide a US mailing address. Contest open to US residents only ages 13 and up. One winner per household. Void where prohibited by law.Good luck!last_img read more

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Shooting the Bang Bang Club

first_img9 April 2009 Cape Town is usually the scene of many international film crews and A-list celebrities, but Johannesburg is catching up. Recently, the crew and actors of a new movie, The Bang Bang Club, arrived in the city to start filming. The indie movie revolves around a group of four friends, all photojournalists, who recorded the violent, dying days of apartheid in and around the townships of Johannesburg in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The four friends – Ken Oosterbroek, Kevin Carter, Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva – became known as the Bang Bang Club. The film’s director, South African-born Steven Silver, starting filming a week ago, and anticipates calling it a wrap by the end of the year. So far, he is happy with the way things are going. “I am extremely pleased with the filming – I couldn’t be happier.” He describes the South African crew as “the best in the world”. Silver is primarily a documentary maker who has a law degree from Wits University. His first film experience was working on the six-part documentary series called Soweto. He then wrote and directed a short drama, Blink, which won an award at the Weekly Mail Film Festival. In 1997 he directed Gerrie & Louise, a documentary based on the truth commission, which won an Emmy Award. Silver moved to Toronto, Canada, and directed several documentaries namely Boxcar Rebellion, Doctor’s Strike and The Anglo Boer War. His three-part series Machine Gun: History Down the Barrel of a Gun was aired on the Discovery Channel. His feature documentary The Last Just Man, was based on the experience of Canadian General Romeo Dallaire during the 1994 Rwanda genocide. It won several international awards. He then wrote and directed Inside Information, a feature documentary about a journalist covering the conflict in the Middle East, and The Soul of India, a documentary on the rise of Hindu fascism in India. His recent work includes the feature documentary Diameter of a Bomb, Killer Flu, and The Dark Years, an innovative three-part animated documentary. Hollywood actors The Bang Bang Club stars Hollywood actors Ryan Phillippe, Malin Akerman and Taylor Kitsch. Phillippe plays Marinovich, Akerman plays a photo editor, and Kitsch plays Carter. Silva is played by South African actor Neels van Jaarsveld and Oosterbroek is played by South African-born actor, Frank Rauthenbach. The movie is based on the book of the same name, written by Marinovich and Silva, the two surviving photojournalists of the Bang Bang Club. Marinovich describes a scene in the first chapter of the book: “Earlier that morning we had been working the back streets and alleys of Thokoza township’s devastated no-man’s-land that we – Ken Oosterbroek, Kevin Carter, Joao and I – had become so familiar with over the years of chasing confrontations between police, soldiers, modern-day Zulu warriors and Kalashnikov-toting youngsters as apartheid came to its bloody end.” Marinovich describes how he got shot in the chest, but also how Oosterbroek was fatally shot in the same township confrontation. “The boys were no longer untouchable, and, before the bloodstains faded from the concrete beside the wall, another of us would be dead.” Silver identifies with the story. He said in a recent interview; “I identify with people who journey to unusual destinations and who return with unusual stories. That’s their job and it’s a service I provide as well.” Silver has been working on the script for the six to seven years, and has written 18 drafts of the script. The movie is to be a feature film not a documentary. Death of Oosterbroek and Carter Two of the Bang Bang Club members died shortly after the transition to democracy. Oosterbroek was shot dead in Thokoza township in Ekurhuleni in 1994, while filming a bloody encounter between hostel dwellers and the National Peacekeeping Force. He died on 18 April, nine days before the country’s first democratic elections. Oosterbroek was the chief photographer of The Star, and won the World Press Award in 1993, the SA Press Photographer of the Year award in 1989, 1991 and 1994. “Ken was a larger than life presence, an intricate personality and a wonderful talent,” wrote fellow journalist Louise Marsland of a 10th anniversary exhibition of his work in Johannesburg in 2004. “His untimely death in the crossfire between hostel dwellers and a South African peacekeeping force was a great tragedy.” Some 16 people died in Ekurhuleni townships at the same time as Oosterbroek was killed. Marinovich was wounded in the crossfire. Carter committed suicide in July 1994, after winning the Pulitzer Prize in March 1993. The winning, iconic picture was taken in Sudan, and recorded a vulture sitting ominously behind a painfully thin child. There has been speculation about whether the photograph and the questions raised by it led to his suicide. Silva and Marinovich Silva, who has been working in Afghanistan and Iraq for the past six years, now works for the New York Times, while Marinovich does social documentary work, and is working on two books. Marinovich won the Pulitzer Prize for his 1990 Soweto picture of a man hacking at the burning, crouching figure of another man, with a panga. Both have been called in to consult on the making of the film, and so far both are happy with the production. Marinovich says Silver is doing “an amazing job”. “He is trying to keep many of the scenes as close as possible to the original,” adds Marinovich. Being on the set, which includes Nancefield Hostel in Soweto, brings back a lot of memories of the time for Marinovich. Silva says that 15 years later, the memory is still raw. “It is not traumatic, but I feel very flat and somewhat depressed.” Marinovich says that film extras include people who lived in the hostels at the time, and newcomers. Scenes have to be re-shot to capture the violence and drama because the extras often burst out laughing, perhaps in disbelief of the times. Silva says that, as a photojournalist, there are times when he wants to burst into tears. “It won’t make a difference – it is always an emotion that won’t go away.” Marinovich recalls taking photographs of the hostel men at the time, who wanted to pose with their weapons, in a “bizarre studio shoot”. “It was amazing theatre,” he says. The book was published in 2000, and the contract for the film was signed in 2002. The club didn’t exist as a formal club, says Silvo. It was labelled the Bang Bang Club by Time magazine, who picked it up as The Bang Bang Paparazzi from an article in another publication. Filming will be taking place in Johannesburg’s central business district, Soweto, Sandton, Melville, the Magaliesberg mountains, and in the Ekurhuleni township of Thokoza. The first scenes are being filmed in The Blues Room cigar bar in the Village Walk shopping centre in Sandton, which has been transformed into Jameson’s, a popular bar in Commissioner Street frequented by journalists in the 1980s. Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

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SA to host women’s cricket challenge

first_imgLocal cricketer Olivia Anderson is making a name for herself in England. (Image: Cricinfo) South Africa was recently chosen to host the inaugural ICC Women’s Cricket Challenge, which will take place in Potchefstroom, North West province, from 6 to 16 October 2010.The tournament will be played under the auspices of the International Cricket Council (ICC), with Cricket South Africa (CSA) as the official host.According to the ICC, the challenge will take the form of all-women teams, currently ranked between fifth and 10th in the world, competing in a series of one day intenational (ODI) and Twenty20 fixtures. Countries in the line-up are South Africa, the Netherlands, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Ireland.“This tournament is an ideal way for the women’s teams ranked outside of the top four to gain more match experience in both ODI and Twenty20 formats,” ICC global development manager Matthew Kennedy said in a statement.The first round of the challenge will consist of ODIs, while the spectators’ favourite – the Twenty20 games – will begin on 14 October. Most of the matches will be played at the North West University’s Potchefstroom campus.It’s hoped the October competition will shake up women’s ODI rankings and enable some of the competing countries to qualify for the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup to be played in India in 2013.“The tournament will also provide a good challenge for all six competing teams, as none of them has yet qualified for the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup,” Kennedy said.The top-four women ODI teams – England, New Zealand, India and defending champions Australia – have already qualified for the World Cup, which features eight nations.South Africa participated in the 2009 World Cup held in Australia, and hosted it in 2005.The country’s female players are expected to perform well in the African qualifier games, which will wrap up in December 2010.The final international qualifiers, to be held in Bangladesh in November 2011, will see 10 nations battle it out for the four remaining World Cup spots.SA women on a good wicketSouth Africa’s first national women’s cricket squad was selected in 1997 and since then the country taken bold steps to develop the sport for females – this includes setting up the Cricket South Africa Women’s Cricket Committee.Women’s cricket gained further momentum in South Africa at the start of the millennium when competitions such as the interprovincial league were initiated. In the early 2000s more than 9 000 females from 1 109 schools and 269 clubs were playing cricket, according to CSA.Local batswoman Olivia Anderson, who debuted for South Africa in 2008, is currently making a name for herself in the UK playing for Shepperton Cricket Club. She’s racked up 1 000 runs this season, after scoring 76 off 66 balls in a match against Purley Redoubtables on 8 August.Although the final player selections for the October challenge have yet to be announced, Anderson is one of the favourites for the South African squad.last_img read more

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