RHE man is going to jail for property fixes

first_imgCOURTS: He did not get permits or undo changes before deadline. He will appeal six-month sentence. By Megan Bagdonas STAFF WRITER He built a fence, a retaining wall, a patio and a few concrete columns to decorate his driveway, and now Francisco Linares is going to jail for it. Linares had been given six months to get final permits for the offending structures or remove them as part of a plea agreement reached in January, when he pleaded no contest to five misdemeanor counts of violating the Rolling Hills Estates building code. If he failed to do one or the other, Linares faced six months in county jail. On Monday, Torrance Superior Court Judge Sandra Thompson chastised Linares, a Farmers Insurance district manager, for not completing what he agreed to do in January and then handed him the maximum sentence without possibility of house arrest or probation. “Imagine my disappointment to find we are no further along in resolving these issues,” Thompson said. “At the rate we’re going, we’ll still be talking about this at my retirement party.” Linares is scheduled to report to county jail Sept. 10. “I’m not scared,” Linares said about spending time in jail. “It’s just very unfair. The city said they wanted to teach me a lesson because they thought I wanted to get away with a lot of stuff.” Richard Hamar, Linares’ attorney, said he has never heard of anything like this. “We’re talking about fixing a fence that was on city property,” he said. “He didn’t build a Las Vegas casino. You put a guy in jail for six months because he repaired the city fence?” The 51-year-old bought the nearly 1-acre property in the 4600 block of Palos Verdes Drive North in 1998. After tearing down an adobe house on the site and building a 3,000-square-foot French-style home, he began landscaping. When Linares asked the city to repair the white three-railed fence behind his house, he was told it was on his property and his responsibility. So he replaced the termite-infested planks. Then the city reversed itself and said Linares had illegally built the fence on city property. In October 2004, the city charged Linares with three misdemeanors: for not taking down the fence, having a retaining wall built higher than a 2-foot restriction and for erecting stone columns without a neighborhood compatibility analysis. Later inspections found eight other violations, including a lack of permits for plumbing and grading. “He’s had a couple of years to correct the problems,” said Dean Pucci, a Fullerton attorney contracted as the city’s prosecutor. “His options were to obtain final permits or remove all of these structures built without permits.” Linares lives in the house with his wife and three daughters. He contends that he didn’t remove the structures because he believed the permits would be approved. However, Pucci said no permits are pending, since Linares failed to resubmit an application that was deemed incomplete. At the sentencing, Hamar said his client was a good Christian man who has never committed a crime and who worked diligently – 142 hours – to try to resolve the issues with the city. And the only reason he was not able to complete the stipulations of the plea agreement, he said, was because of the city’s confusing building codes and negligence in rendering a decision on his permit applications. “We established that he did everything that was humanly possible to comply. And the un-rebutted evidence is that (the city) hasn’t ruled on the permits,” Hamar said. “To ? do something as harsh as put a good man in jail for six months, you got to look at the impact on society. What will society gain if you put this man in jail?” The prosecutor, however, said, “In virtually every city in every county a violation of the municipal code is a crime.” Hamar said he plans to appeal. “I’m praying that there will be an appeal and that my dad won’t be sentenced to jail,” said daughter Vanessa Linares, 18. “My dad is the backbone of our family. How would we be able to hold up if he’s not here?” megan.bagdonas@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgTODAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with identification are admitted free. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John Phillips40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. every Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 317-7021. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymouswill meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Dance Groove will give ballroom and Latin dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. Dance Groove Studio, 43631 10th St. W., Lancaster. Cost: $5 per person. Call (661) 948-9101. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12-Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo, 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors should meet in the main lobby. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at the Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call for information and location: Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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18 years of freedom for Nelson Mandela

first_imgOn 11 February 1990 the Sunday Timesnewspaper published the first photoof Nelson Mandela seen in 27years. Photos of prisoners were prohibitedunder the apartheid regime. WithMandela is then State President FWde Klerk A special Monday edition of the WeeklyMail, published on 12 February 1990,celebrated Mandela’s releaseKhanyi MagubaneOn 11 February 1990, Nelson Mandela walked out of prison, a free man, after serving 27 years of a life sentence imposed by the apartheid government. The world watched as South Africa was suddenly catapulted on the journey to democracy.Mandela appeared from the gates of the Victor Verster prison in Paarl, Western Cape, hand-in-hand with Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, who was then his wife. His appearance was met with mass euphoria as hundreds had gathered to witness this historic occasion. Both local and international media jostled for the perfect picture or video footage, as Mandela, dressed in a light brown suit, smiled and greeted the crowds before punching a fist in the air, in the “Amandla” tradition.Mandela was then whisked away to Cape Town, to deliver his first speech as a free man. At about 8pm that evening, he appeared on the balcony of Cape Town’s City Hall to address about 50 000 people assembled to listen to him. He opened his speech with these words: “I stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant of you, the people. Your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. I therefore place the remaining years of my life in your hands. On this day of my release, I extend my sincere and warmest gratitude to the millions of my compatriots and those in every corner of the globe who have campaigned tirelessly for my release.”In his speech, he spelt out the way forward for the country, to unite races and forge a future based on the foundation of democracy. He spoke of the need to address the social ills and disintegration of the family structure caused by the fight against apartheid. He then closed his speech, using a quotation from the June 1964 Treason Trial, which is where he was convicted on treason charges, and sentenced to life imprisonment:“In conclusion I wish to quote my own words during my trial in 1964. They are true today as they were then: ‘I have fought against white domination and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.’”After his conviction, Mandela was sent to Robben Island. He served his sentence there for 18 years before being transferred to Pollsmoor Prison on the mainland in 1982. The campaign to release him from prison started as early as 1980, when then-African National Congress (ANC) president, the late Oliver Reginald Tambo, began drumming up international support for Mandela’s release.After 10 years of lobbying, the apartheid government, under the leadership of FW de Klerk, succumbed to pressure. On the 2nd of February 1990, then-president De Klerk announced the lifting of the ban on the ANC and other liberation movements and said that Mandela would soon be released.Four years after his release, on 10 May 1994, Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as South Africa’s first democratically elected president. During his inaugural speech, he closed his address with these powerful words: “Never, never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. Let freedom reign.” Mandela served one five-year term and retired in 1999.Useful linksNelson Mandela MuseumThe ANCThe Nelson Mandela’s children’s fund46664 – an Aids organisation started by Mandela using his prison numberlast_img read more

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HI appoints Mukesh as Michael Nobbs’ deputy

first_imgThree-time Olympian Mukesh Kumar, who created a stir by walking out of a national camp recently after being denied charge of the junior side, has been appointed as coach of the senior mens hockey team and will work under chief coach Michael Nobbs of Australia.Confirming Mukeshs appointment, Hockey India secretary general Narinder Batra said that the veteran Olympian and Padma Shri will resume his duties in the new role from Thursday.”Mukesh has been appointed as a coach of the senior mens team. He will be a part of the coachs set-up engaged with the team under chief coach Nobbs,” Batra said.Asked about the tenure of his contract, Batra said, “It has not yet been finalised. It depends on the chief coachs wish because as per Nobbs contract he also has to train our Indian coaches.”Mukesh, 41, created a controversy earlier this month when he left the national camp in Sports Authority of India, Bangalore a few hours after his arrival in protest after being denied the chief coachs post of the junior team.Mukesh, who agreed to be part of the Indian set-up on conditions that he would either assist a foreign coach or assume complete charge of the junior team, was shocked when he learnt that he will have to work under former senior national coach Harendra Singh.As expected Mukesh was delighted with the development, saying it was his long-cherished dream to work with the senior team.”I always wanted to work under a foreign coach as his assistant. I was offered the coachs post of the womens team but I refused because I wanted to be a part of the mens set- up,” he said.advertisementMukesh represented India in three consecutive Olympics starting from 1992 Barcelona Games, where it finished seventh.He made 307 international appearance for India and scored 80 goals.last_img read more

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