Injured footballer waits for delayed £80k payment

first_imgA personal injury solicitor says his client waited weeks for damages due to him in October as the identity of the insurer in the case was concealed.Paul Mulderrig, of north west firm Mulderrigs Solicitors, represented amateur footballer Paul Shipley (pictured) at Newcastle Combined Court in October where it was ordered that another footballer Lee Simpson pay around £22,000 damages and £60,000 costs. Simpson had contested the claim, which related to a a fractured left tibia incurred in a tackle on Shipley in 2013.Despite the judgment ordering payment to Shipley’s solicitors by 28 October, no amounts were immediately forthcoming.Mulderrig said the defendant firm in the case, Kennedys, working under the terms of an insurance policy issued to Durham County Football Association Ltd, had refused to reveal the identity of Simpson’s insurers. This made it harder to find out whom to pursue for the outstanding money.Mulderrig told the Gazette: ’As a matter of principle, where a solicitor represents an insurer who has stepped into litigation they ought not to be allowed to keep the identity of that insurer secret as has happened here.‘The conduct of the insurer has a direct impact on the amount of cost and work that a claimant is put to during the course of the case – in this case the insurer’s unreasonable conduct added many thousands of pounds to the costs of the action – and the claimant ought to know the identity of the insurer putting him to that cost.’Mulderrig said his client, who worked as a draughtsman and was expecting his first child at the time of the match, has never returned to football and the injury has had a long-lasting impact on his life.He had attempted to negotiate a settlement over the past three years but Mulderrig says the defendants rejected all invitations.Despite several emails to Kennedys, no payment was made until last week, when around a quarter of the sum was transferred. Mulderrig said £60,000 was still outstanding four weeks after the court-imposed deadline.A spokesman for Kennedys confirmed that it acted in Shipley v Simpson and said the claimant’s damages were paid last week.He added: ‘We have asked the loss adjuster involved in the claim to expedite the costs payment to Mulderiggs Solicitors and have continued to chase for payment to be made, as we are not authorised to make this payment on the client’s behalf. We have also kept Mr Mulderigg updated on what we have been doing to press for costs payment. Client confidentiality prevents us from sharing the name of our client but we can confirm that there is no conflict of interest in this case.’last_img read more

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GALLERY: Inquirer Sports’ best photos of 2019

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Relive the action, drama and celebration captured by INQUIRER Sports lensmen Tristan Tamayo, Sherwin Vardeleon, August dela Cruz and Earvin Perlas.Gilas Pilipinas women huddle during the 3×3 women’s basketball event in the 30th Southeast Asian Games. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netNOVEMBER 27, 2019: Philippines’ Chima Uzoka soars for an interception against Myanmar’s Ye Min Thu. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonDECEMBER 1, 2019: Philippines’ Marian Capadocia connects a backhand against Indonesia. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonDECEMBER 3, 2019: Philippines’ Francisco Solis (red) exchange blows with Indonesia’s Widiyanto Yusuf (blue) during the men’s Sanda 56 kg category in the Wushu competition final in the 30th South East Asian Games 2019. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Carlos Yulo competes in the men’s Artistic Gymnastics Horizontal Bars during the 30th Southeast Asian Games. INQUIRER PHOTO/Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Wally Divine (blue) celebrates after defeating Vietnam’s Nguyen Thi Chinh (red) during the women’s Sanda 48 kg category in the wushu competition final in the 30th Southeast Asian Games. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Haniel Abella celebrates after defeating Singapore to claim the gold medal in the Women’s Team Epee Fencing of the 30th Southeast Asian Games. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Junna Tsukii (red) celebrates after defeating Vietnam’s Dinh Thi Huong (blue) to claim the gold medal of the women’s Karatedo -50 kg of the 30th Southeast Asian Games. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Haniel Abella fights against Singapore’s Cheryl Lim during the Women’s Team Epee Fencing of the 30th Southeast Asian Games. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Eumir Felix Marcial fights with Vietnam’s Nguyen Manh Cuong during the 30th Southeast Asian Games men’s middleweight (75 kg) event. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonThe Philippines’ Christian Concepcion settles for silver against Vu Than An of Vietnam in the men’s fencing individual sabre in the 2019 SEA Games at the World Trade Center. INQUIRER PHOTO/AUGUST DELA CRUZThe Philippines’ Mar Vincent Diano celebrates after scoring against the Timor-Leste team during the 2019 Southeast Asian Games at Binan Football Stadium on Wednesday. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Earvin PerlasThe Philippines’ Hidlyn Diaz competes in the women’s snatch 55kg weightlifting at the 30th SEA Games 2019. INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonADVERTISEMENT PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 03:30PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:34PH’s Carlo Paalam boxing light flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:39PH’s Josie Gabuco boxing light flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown01:54MMDA deploys rescue team to Batangas following Taal eruption FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4 MOST READ Leonardo DiCaprio, Taika Waititi, other stars react to Oscar nominations Thailand reports case of coronavirus from China No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist LATEST STORIES NFA assures ample rice supply in ashfall, eruption-affected areas Microsoft ends free Windows 7 security updates on Tuesday When Pops met Martin’s son Santino ‘People evacuated on their own’ View comments Lava gushes out of Taal Volcano as villagers flee Serena Williams, Wozniacki to play doubles in Aucklandlast_img read more

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Open letter to Caricom

first_imgDear Editor,If there was any doubt the Government of Guyana fell on December 21, 2018, the Caribbean Court of Justice’s (CCJ) ruling on June 18, layered with consequential orders issued on July 12, 2019, now affirms the Guyana Government was defeated in a No-Confidence Motion on that day. The facts are unambiguous, pellucidly clear and unequivocally affirmed by the CCJ. The Constitution of Guyana requires that the President and the Cabinet resign with immediate effect, the President and his Government transition into a caretaker role, the elections held within 90 days, by September 18, in a new timeline which began on June 18, the day of the CCJ ruling. In addition, the CCJ ruled that a new GECOM Chair be appointed urgently in accordance with the Constitution.These realities are not the imposition of a rogue court. These realities are in accordance with the laws of Guyana, its Constitution, with the CCJ merely pointing out the cold, hard facts.As a Caribbean citizen with a deep commitment to the success and effectiveness of Caricom, given the CCJ’s unequivocal judgment, Caricom’s position is of critical importance. Caricom has been totally silent so far, nearly nine months after the NCM in Guyana’s Parliament, insisting its commitment is towards democracy in every Caricom country and, in fact, everywhere in the Commonwealth and in the world. I stood proud as a Caribbean citizen every time, and there are many such instances, when Caricom firmly and bravely stood on the side of democracy, whenever and wherever democracy was threatened. In view of the CCJ ruling on the NCM in Guyana, where does Caricom stand?Mr Secretary General, democracy is threatened in Guyana as the Guyana Government refuses to adhere to the Constitution and the will of Parliament. When a Government deliberately sabotages its own Constitution and disrespects the legal system, as the APNU/AFC Government is presently doing in Guyana, democracy is threatened. Will Caricom maintain silence as Guyana plunges into a dictatorship?Caricom itself, in the midst of the clumsy Government’s challenge of the NCM and its validity, insisted the legal avenues must be honoured and, therefore, it will not voice any position on the political dispute in Guyana, one of its founding members. It took this position even though the parliamentary outcome was clear on December 21, 2018. Whatever doubt the Government attempted to stir has now been dismissed by the CCJ. The CCJ left nothing for interpretation – the Guyana Government is a caretaker Government and it must follow the Constitution, holding elections within three months. What is Caricom waiting on now?Caricom’s silence on what is happening in Guyana brings disrepute to this body and will forever impact on its future position on various matters. First, Caricom’s future positions on any threat to democracy anywhere will seem hollow and hypocritical. How could an organisation which turned a blind eye to the sabotaging of the Constitution by one of its own members challenge undemocratic behaviour in other countries or even in another of its member states? Caricom’s silence as the Constitution of Guyana is being railroaded potentially disqualifies Caricom from ever again being a legitimate voice against undemocratic actions anywhere.Second, the CCJ’s own future is in jeopardy and Caricom’s silence is contributing to a perilous future for the CCJ. The CCJ is one of the most important institutions in Caricom. The strength and integrity of Caricom are dependent on a strong and respected CCJ. If the CCJ’s rulings and orders are allowed to be ignored by a Government, as is happening in Guyana right now, then the CCJ is rendered a toothless poodle. We must not allow this to happen. At the very least, Caricom must take a stance that the CCJ ruling is sacrosanct, with no room to disrespect the institution. In accordance with Guyana’s Constitution which the CCJ affirms, the Guyana Government is a caretaker Government and will become an illegal Government after September 18. Caricom must end its silence and forcefully call on the Government of Guyana to enforce the CCJ rulings, following faithfully the provisions of the Constitution of Guyana.The CCJ has spoken and Caricom has no reason to equivocate. If Caricom does not support its own institution and stand by it, why should anyone want to continue with the CCJ? The deliberate and contemptuous disregard being demonstrated by the Guyana Government in regards to the CCJ’s ruling is a fatal threat to the CCJ. Why should any of the countries that presently subscribe to the CCJ continue to honour this onerous burden for an institution that is merely a paper tiger, a toothless poodle? Why would any country that presently includes the CCJ as its final court continue to honour this obligation if the Court is a paper tiger only? Why should any country which presently is thinking of using the CCJ as its final court do so if the CCJ is nothing but a talk shop?This is Caricom’s dilemma. While you equivocate, refusing to comment and refusing to urge the Guyana Government to adhere to its Constitution, while you continue to behave as if it is business as usual in Guyana, the credibility of Caricom, the legitimacy of your institutions, are being eroded by your silence, your very thunderous silence. Your silence has caused, if not more than 50 per cent, at least 50 per cent of the Guyanese people to lose faith in Caricom.The time has come for Caricom to stand by the principles of the Treaty of Chaguaramas and the 2001 Nassau Declaration, and speak out against the erosion of democracy in Guyana, against the deliberate perversions of the Constitution of Guyana. This is not an option for Caricom, it is a duty-bound to stand up on behalf of democracy in Guyana.Yours sincerely,Dr Leslie Ramsammylast_img read more

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