Saudi Arabia says 2 more MERS patients have died

first_imgTwo more Saudi Arabians have died of MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) infections, the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH) reported today. Both cases had been announced previously.The patients were a 75-year-old “citizen” in Al-Ahsa governorate and a 63-year-old woman in Riyadh. The MOH simultaneously also announced the recovery of three other MERS patients: a 61-year-old citizen in Al-Ahsa, a 41-year-old woman in the Riyadh region, and a 50-year-old woman in the Eastern region.The two deaths raise the Saudi death toll, unofficially, to 36, out of 64 cases. At this writing, the MOH’s coronavirus overview page has not been updated since Jun 24 and still lists the death toll at 34.The current World Health Organization global count, which does not include the latest deaths, stands at 77 cases and 40 deaths.Neither Saudi Arabia nor any other country has reported any new MERS cases since Jun 23, when the MOH announced seven, six of which were described as asymptomatic. The lull follows a very active MERS-CoV period of about 2 months.It was on May 2 that Saudi Arabia announced seven new MERS-CoV cases, including five deaths. It later became clear that these were part of an outbreak that involved at least three hospitals in Al-Ahsa; it eventually grew to 25 cases.The month of May also brought the first MERS-CoV cases in France, Tunisia, and Italy.France’s first case involved a man who had vacationed in the United Arab Emirates, while the Tunisian case was in a man who had been in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. In Italy, a man who had traveled to Jordan became infected.All three of these cases led to one or two more cases in close contacts but did not lead to ongoing spread of the virus.See also:Jul 2 Saudi MOH statementMay 2 CIDRAP News story about seven Saudi caseslast_img read more

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Luján Honors Distinguished Vietnam War Veteran

first_imgAfter returning from service, Trujillo became an active member of the Rio Costilla and Taos community, helping fellow veterans as an advocate. Trujillo is a retired member of the Rio Costilla Cooperative Livestock. He has one daughter and one grandson. At a ceremony Monday in Taos, Luján presented Louis Trujillo with the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin to thank and honor Trujillo for his service to the country. In March 1968, Trujillo was wounded while traveling with his army personnel carrier when it was hit by a land mine. He was subsequently awarded a Purple Heart for his bravery and service, in addition to receiving the Bronze Star and Combat Infantry Badge.   Monday’s pinning ceremony was part of a national effort to honor Vietnam-era veteran military service members who were on active duty between Nov. 1, 1955, and May 15, 1975. Commemorative partners have helped communities publicly and individually thank 2.3 million Vietnam Veterans and their families through more than 15,000 ceremonies. “Louis Trujillo is a valued community member whose sacrifice to our country has earned him the Purple Heart award, the Bronze Star, and a Combat Infantry Badge. I was honored to thank him for his service and sacrifice with the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin,” Luján said. “Louis has spent his life serving others, and I was glad to thank him for his honorable military service.” CONGRESSIONAL News: Trujillo was born in Rio Costilla, New Mexico, Aug. 19, 1944. After enlisting, Trujillo served in the U.S. Army 9th Infinity Division. More than 11,000 local, state and national organizations have partnered with the United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration to honor the 6.4 million living Vietnam veterans. TAOS ― U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.), the U.S. House Assistant Speaker, presented a local Vietnam War veteran with the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin – a commendation of the nation’s lasting thanks to U.S. military veterans who served during the Vietnam War.last_img read more

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Posts From The Road: Loneliest Road In America

first_imgNevada Highway 50 is known as‘The Loneliest Road in America’. The road spans just over 400 miles across the state but travelers pass through only six towns. Three of those towns are located near the California border leaving only three small towns between Fallon, Nev. and the eastern border of Nevada, a distance of over 300 miles. Drivers travel more than 17 mountain ranges on the drive making it fell like a roller coaster with miles of straight road between passes. The route of the road follows the same path as the Pony Express during in the 1860s. While some may not like traveling such a highway, I have driven the highway multiple times and find the road and the people living in these small towns very interesting. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comEly, Nev. was founded in the 1800s and based on the mining industry. While nearby Connors Pass, elevation 7,729, is the highest elevation point on Highway 50 in Nevada, Ely sits at about 6,500 feet and is home to more than 4,000 people today. Mining and tourism provide are the largest source of income. Shown is a view of main street in Ely. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com A lone trucker heads to the open valley below after topping a mountain pass on Highway 50. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comEureka is a small town of only a few hundred people, it is a welcome stop when traveling Nevada Highway 50. The town does offer basic needs of travelers passing through. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comShown is one of many stretches of Highway 50 between mountain passes that runs straight as an arrow. The lack of traffic, human presence, and very little vegetation are reasons the highway is know as‘The Loneliest Road in America’. Photo by Gary WarrenAustin, Nev. is the smallest of the lonely towns with a population of less than 200. Shown is a building in Austin that houses an antique shop on main street. Residents of Austin travel more than 100 miles to Fallon, Nev. for groceries. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comEditor’s note: Longtime Los Alamos photographer Gary Warren and his wife Marilyn are traveling around the country and he shares his photographs, which appear in the ‘Posts from the Road’ series published in the Sunday edition of the Los Alamos Daily Post.last_img read more

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British Land to spec ‘Cheese Grater’

first_imgAdmitting the coming year would be ‘challenging’, chief executive Stephen Hester, is taking a £286m punt that the City market for office rentals has four years left to run. Announcing a 13% rise in British Land’s underlying trading pretax profits to £257m, Hester said: ‘Will 2011 be a great year? It is impossible to tell. There could be risks from supply. But the risks are always on our side in the long term . . . I’m not saying the market will be great in 2011, but our building will be the best available in that year. Our job is to know how to add value.’last_img

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North Fork News

first_imgMattituck-Laurel LibraryThere will be a book discussion on “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley at the Mattituck-Laurel Library on Thursday, October 31, 6:30 PM.The film “Luce” will be shown on Friday, November 1, at 1:30 PM. A married couple is forced to reckon with their idealized image of their son, adopted from war-torn Eritrea, after an alarming discovery by a devoted high school teacher threatens his status as an all-star student.On Friday at 4 PM, “It’s a Bison” will be held for kindergartners and first graders. Learn about the Bison and how this magnificent animal gets confused with a Buffalo.Join Bev Wowak for a Literary Café on Saturday, November 2 at 10 AM, a popular, informal gathering of book lovers for coffee and talk about all things literary. Open to the public.On Monday, November 4, at 10:30 AM, Babies Boogie will be held for ages three-to-24 months with a caregiver, an interactive movement and music program. Toddlers Tango for ages 25 months to three years with caregiver will take place at 11:30 AM, a high-energy experience with fun musical props for you and your toddler.Also on Monday, at 6:30 PM, Estate Planning 101 will be offered. Learn the fundamentals of estate planning from an expert. The presentation focuses upon a few key documents, the last will and testament, power of attorney, health care proxy, and living wills, and a discussion on revocable versus irrevocable trusts.On Tuesday, November 5, at 3 PM, Kindness Counts Tuesdays, for grades seven to 12, will teach students how to make braided dog toys for local animal shelters.All events are free. Contact 631-298-4134 or www.mattlibrary.org for more details.Explore HallockvilleThere’s a guided exploration of Hallockville and beyond, at the Hallockville Museum Farm, 6038 Sound Avenue, Northville, on Saturday, November 2, 10 AM to noon. Join for a guided walk around this historic farm and up to the trails of Hallock State Park, led by local historian Richard Wines and local birder Nancy Gilbert. Along the way, hear of the successful, cooperative effort that resulted in the conservation of this 525-acre landscape. The program is co-sponsored by Peconic Land Trust and Hallockville Museum Farm. Rain cancelsVisit www.peconiclandtrust.org/get-involved/events for more details.East End EnvironmentProject Feeder Watch at Downs Farm in Cutchogue will be held on Sunday, November 3, from 1 to 2 PM. If you simply love watching birds, want to know what feed to use to attract certain birds, or are stumped on what kinds of feeders to use, you are invited to join for this introduction into the Project Feeder Watch Citizen Science program, an international program from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology dedicated to understanding songbird populations.For more information, contact Christine Tylee at ctylee@eastendenvironment.org.A Bay to Sound Trail Cleanup will be held in Southold, on Sunday, November 3, from 1 to 3:30 PM. The cleanups and trail clearing will take place in Southold and Greenport. Activities include trail clearing, raking/spreading wood chips, and garbage removal. Gloves, bags, and necessary equipment will be provided, as well as water and snacks. For more details and meeting location, contact Aaron at 631-765-6450 ext. 218 or acvirgin@eastendenvironment.org.Dysphagia TalkJoin Caitlin Saxtein, speech language pathologist, as she discusses the complexity of dysphagia. This will take place on Monday, November 4, from 11 AM to noon at Riverhead’s Peconic Bay Medical Center’s Caregivers Center. This is a free educational workshop for individuals plus their caregivers. Space is limited. Call 631-548-6259 to reserve your spot. Sharelast_img read more

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Novatek share buyback extended

first_imgRussia’s Novatek, operator of the Yamal LNG project, informed it approved the extension of the share buyback program until 7 June, 2016.On 7 June, 2012, the company’s Board of Directors approved a one-year buyback program in respect of ordinary shares of Novatek and/or Global Depositary Receipts representing shares (each GDR representing 10 shares) in the aggregate amount of up to 600 million US dollars.The terms of the program provide for its extension by a decision of the company’s Management Board. On 27 May in 2014, the company’s Management Board approved the extension of the share buyback program until 7 June, 2015, Novatek said in a statement on Thursday.Novatek Equity (Cyprus) Limited, a unit of the Russian company, through an independent broker purchases shares and/or GDRs on the Moscow Exchange and the London Stock Exchange respectively, at market prices at the time of purchase.As of 21 May, 2015, 14,191,610 ordinary shares have been purchased on the open market as part of the program implementation, Novatek added.[mappress mapid=”16473″]Image: Novateklast_img read more

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Right to a lawyer: UK’s wrecking proposal

first_imgThe debate on the European Unions’s proposed directive on the right to a lawyer at all stages of criminal proceedings is hotting up. The Gazette covered the recent parliamentary motion tabled by the government where the justice secretary recommended that the UK opt out of the draft directive. The motion was supported by the House of Commons by 303 to 192. Now the UK has put its name to a note supported by four other countries (Belgium, France, Ireland and the Netherlands) launching a variety of criticisms of the proposal. So the UK not only wants to opt out, it also wants to ensure that UK citizens arrested in other member states do not benefit from improved rights. Would not opting out have been enough, if all they wanted was to ensure that UK law was not affected? Why would a government wish to ensure that its citizens do not benefit from maximum protection when arrested abroad? Is such protection not one of its core duties? As the shadow spokesman pointed out at the time of the Commons debate, the UK’s current law is in any case broadly in line with the directive’s requirements. It seems churlish both to opt out and to try to block the measure applying elsewhere. As to the note itself, the five countries – rather like a QC repeating ‘with respect’ before every argument insulting counsel on the other side – begin with an account of their total and slavish devotion to fundamental rights in general, and the right to a lawyer in particular. ‘For these reasons,’ they say, ‘it is essential to get this directive right.’ They then give four reasons why they disagree with the current draft. The CCBE is looking into the arguments so as to issue a properly argued rebuttal. However, the first three arguments do not strike me as sufficient justification for the group’s paper, meaning they are exactly the kind of traditional matters to be raised in negotiations (which is not to say I agree with them). For instance, the paper argues that the right to a lawyer should not necessarily exist at all stages of the proceedings (say, when fingerprints are taken, which is an example used by the government in the House of Commons) or regardless of the gravity of the charge. Again, the five countries argue that the right to a lawyer is not the only factor to be taken into account when measuring access to justice, since issues such as maximum police detention and speed of being brought to trial should also be considered. Finally, the note requests that the Commission explain exactly where the new rights depart from the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights, and what the impact of such departure would be. No, the main part of the paper – the wrecking proposal – comes at the end when the following appears: ‘The relationship between rules on access to a lawyer and rules on legal aid needs thorough political discussion. Any directive on the right of access to a lawyer should take into account the consequential costs and implications for member states’ legal aid systems.’ Legal aid was deliberately separated from the proposal on the right to a lawyer because of its complexity and politically controversial nature. Anything which is attached to the right to legal aid is likely to have a very difficult time passing, particularly in the current economic climate. The desire to attach legal aid to the right to a lawyer shows a wish to see the proposal sink out of sight. Of course, there are cost implications for the current draft, but that has been true of all the measures which have been passed so far. (And, as the Commission points out, the draft directive would in any case reduce costs incurred by appeals to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg by an estimated €11m for all member states over 10 years.) It may be that the UK, far from wishing to opt out, is seeking to amend the draft directive to make it acceptable. Then it would be good to know its minimum terms. But to opt out and seek also to block – when its own citizens can only gain from the directive being passed by the remaining member states – is inexplicable.last_img read more

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Will infrastructure projects happen without ‘hybrid bills’?

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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ALE completes test run

first_imgThe three modules, which had a combined weight of 6,614 tonnes, were lifting using ALE’s 354,000-tonne/metre load moment ring crane. The crane was rigged with a 124 m main boom, a 49 m ballast radius, along with a heavy winch system and 4,000 tonnes of ballast.The final lift, a 2,234-tonne living quarter module, took place this month. ALE completed the first lift in December 2018, as HLPFI reported here.“By using the latest technologies, we could carry out the lifts on schedule and safely, while minimising disruption to the rest of the busy site,” explained Ronnie Adams, ALE’s senior project manager.All three modules have been fitted in Ingleside, Texas as part of a trial run ahead of their permanent installation in Israel. The modules will be removed and transported to the final project site in the second quarter of 2019.www.ale-heavylift.comlast_img read more

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Canefield roads to receive attention

first_imgIncumbent chairman, Simeon AlbertA portion of road within the urban community of Canefield will soon receive attention following the signing of a $65, 000.00 contract.Incumbent chairman of the Canefield Urban Council Simeon Albert in an interview with Dominica Vibes said the contract to repair a small portion of road heading into the Prince Development area was signed on Friday, 27th September. “We expect that somewhere in the next few weeks going into the next month that this project should be fully completed”.He thanked the Dominica Government for its contribution towards this project “because this is a long outstanding project and something that has been affecting the people of the area”. Mr. Albert also indicated that work on the Donkey Beach road is also expected to commence shortly as efforts to receive financial support to repair that section of road is bearing fruit. “The government of Dominica is going to be one of the major contributors towards the financing of this road and as well as the AID Bank”.“So the necessary planning is taking place because the whole idea is to look at positioning sidewalks as well as drainage going towards the beach,” Albert said. Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring! Share LocalNews Canefield roads to receive attention by: – October 1, 2013 34 Views   6 commentscenter_img Share Share Tweetlast_img read more

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