Decades-old federal policy placed Newtok in the path of climate change

first_imgAlaska’s Energy Desk | Climate Change | EnvironmentDecades-old federal policy placed Newtok in the path of climate changeAugust 13, 2018 by Rachel Waldholz, Alaska’s Energy Desk Share:The nearest homes are now just 40 feet from the edge of the Ninglick River. The village could lose that amount of land in just one or two storms. (Photo by Rachel Waldholz/Alaska’s Energy Desk)Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2018/08/13newtok-short1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.On a chilly afternoon last November, I went to visit George Carl, the vice president of the Newtok Village Council. He’s a slight, wiry man in his mid-60s with a bushy gray mustache and a pair of surprisingly hip blue glasses perched on his nose.I stopped by with Andrew John, Newtok’s tribal administrator. We were greeted with instant coffee and – to Andrew’s delight – cinnamon rolls.Newtok, in Western Alaska, is perhaps the most endangered village in Alaska. It’s built on permafrost, and it’s losing about 70 feet of land each year as the Ninglick River eats away at the shore. George Carl’s house is one of the closest to the river.“It’s going to reach my house pretty soon. Probably next summer,” he said.A 2003 report found that most of Alaska’s 200-plus rural villages face flooding and erosion. By 2009, as many as 12 villages were already considering some kind of relocation.But moving a whole village is astronomically expensive. So who’s going to cover those costs? Who is responsible?Some advocates say the answer is the federal government. They say it’s largely because of federal policy that some of these villages are so vulnerable to climate change in the first place.George Carl thinks he’ll see the end of this Newtok. Residents expect the village to become uninhabitable within a matter of years, as the river consumes houses and, eventually, the school and runway.He also remembers the beginning: He was born a few miles away, at a site called Old Kealavik.But in 1958, the Bureau of Indian Affairs built a school at the nearby seasonal camp of Newtok. The story goes that the site was chosen because that was as far as the barge with the building supplies could make it. So that’s where it stopped, and that’s where the school was built.When Carl was about six, his family moved to be near the school. Families from all over the region did the same.“I remembered a guy who was telling our parents that if you want to have our kids put in the school, just move here,” he said.At the time, this was happening all over the state. Many Alaska Native families still moved around seasonally. Carl’s family lived in a sod house, the traditional housing built from the tundra. If a river changed directions and a site flooded, the camp could be rebuilt somewhere else.But when the government started building schools, the villages grew around them, rooting people in place. Other infrastructure followed: clinics and airstrips and power plants.Many of the sites were chosen the way Newtok was – convenience for the builders, not longevity for the village.“No really good planner, or no really good developer would go out to this area and say, ‘Well this is a great place to build a new community!’,” said Sally Russell Cox, a planner with the state of Alaska who has worked with Newtok since 2006.She says their locations have made villages like Newtok more vulnerable to climate change.“That compounded with you know the warming that we’ve seen over quite a lot of years has really impacted these communities,” Cox said.Many locations were already vulnerable to environmental change. And now the landscape is changing faster than expected, with climate-driven shifts like the loss of sea and river ice.Newtok hopes to relocate to a new site, about nine miles upriver. The village has been trying to move for more than two decades, but it’s been a struggle to find the funding. One estimate puts the price tag for relocation at $130 million.Some advocates say Alaska’s history means the federal government has a special responsibility for village relocation.Robin Bronen is with the Alaska Institute for Justice. She’s working with more than a dozen villages trying to decide whether and how to move.“There is some responsibility I think from the federal government because the federal government made the decision to create sedentary coastal communities in the locations now where people are not being able to stay,” she said.At times, Congress has seemed to recognize that responsibility. This spring, lawmakers approved $15 million to help Newtok move, as part of the bipartisan spending bill signed by President Trump. George Carl and others say that’s a big deal for Newtok. But — it’s a one-time fix. It will jump-start the move, but not complete it. And it doesn’t help other communities in the same situation.The schools, of course, did more than simply root people in place. The ripple effects of that policy are still being felt across Alaska today. In Newtok, some 60 years later, George Carl still remembers the culture shock. Everything was in English.“First days of school…I wasn’t understanding nothing at all. Just totally nothing,” he said.He says students weren’t allowed to speak Yup’ik.But many fundamental ways of life continued. For Carl, life in Newtok still revolves around subsistence hunting and fishing. This time of year, for instance, residents hunt for muskrat, mink and otter.That’s why, for George Carl and others in Newtok, it’s so important to relocate to a site nearby – and for families to stick together, and not scatter to other villages and cities around the state. He says he can’t imagine moving to Anchorage.“You know I’m adapted to Mother Nature and the ocean and the river, you know, that kind of food,” he said.The federal government made his family move once. Now, he’s asking for help to move again: this time, to a place of his own choosing.This story is adapted from the podcast Midnight Oil: The Big Thaw. Subscribe on iTunes, NPR One or wherever you get your podcasts.Share this story:last_img read more

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Affinia Therapeutics raises $110 million for gene therapy treatments

first_img Log In | Learn More Adobe By Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe May 4, 2021 Reprints Jonathan Saltzman — Boston Globe GET STARTED What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? Affinia Therapeutics raises $110 million for gene therapy treatments Tags drug developmentgene therapySTAT+ Affinia Therapeutics, a Waltham-based biotech working on gene therapies to treat diseases using technology developed at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said Monday it has raised $110 million in a new venture capital round.The company, which was founded in 2019 based on work pioneered by Luk Vandenberghe, an associate professor at Mass. Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, plans to use the money to advance its gene therapy technology and move experimental drug programs into clinical trials. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints Biotech Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTEDlast_img read more

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Civil Servants in Portland Complete Training Under MOU

first_imgCivil Servants in Portland Complete Training Under MOU UncategorizedSeptember 28, 2006 RelatedCivil Servants in Portland Complete Training Under MOU RelatedCivil Servants in Portland Complete Training Under MOU FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Over 300 civil servants based in Portland, who have successfully completed training in a wide cross-section of areas under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Training Programme, will be graduating today (September 28).Speaking with JIS News, Principal Director, Corporate Management and Development (CMD) in the Public Sector Reform Unit (PSRU), Leonie Harris said that the ceremony will take place at the College of Agriculture, Science and Education (CASE), with Dr. Donald Rhodd, Minister of State, Ministry of National Security and Member of Parliament, East Portland, being the guest speaker.“The MOU training programme began in July 2004 with 18 training institutions partnering with the Cabinet Office in delivering 54 courses to 1,100 employees. The courses include basic computer, computer graphics, meeting and conference planning, etiquette and social graces, Spanish, entrepreneurship, drapery making and floral arrangement,” the Principal Director explained. In June 2005, the programme was expanded to five other parishes and to other categories of workers and public sector organizations.According to Mrs. Harris, 1,600 employees completed 118 courses offered by 42 training institutions, which included high schools, community colleges, teachers’ colleges, HEART Academies and community based training institutions. Courses included bridal consultancy, child care, landscaping, housekeeping, motor vehicle repairs, electrical installation, tiling, first aid and webpage design. “The new MOU signed in 2006 will give civil servants the opportunity to be trained in areas such as computer skills, food and beverage, cake baking and decoration, food preparation, landscaping, housekeeping, garment construction and drapery, entrepreneurship, graphic designing and English Language,” she said.To date, 28 categories of workers in the Public Sector have benefited from the Programme involving 64 public sector organizations. Seventy training institutions have conducted 288 courses with 4,100 employees successfully completing courses.Some public sector workers, under this new MOU, may also participate in training in areas such as e-government, project, change and stress management, writing skills and conflict resolution, which will directly contribute to improved job performance.In February 2004, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the Government of Jamaica and the Jamaica Confederation of Trade Unions (JCTU) outlining the collaborative measures to be implemented to promote the country’s sustainable development.Included in the various clauses of the agreement was a commitment “to improve the quality of the labour force through training, retraining and education and the maintenance of core labour standards in the public sector”.With this commitment as a basis, a training programme was designed aimed at public sector employees, to prepare the workforce for the needs of a modern labour market. Workers were asked to identify the skills which they wanted to acquire and from this, a Summer Training Programme was developed. The employees, under the training programme, were eligible to access training in a wide cross-section of vocational skills.center_img RelatedCivil Servants in Portland Complete Training Under MOU Advertisementslast_img read more

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JICA Alumni Association Promotes its Activities in Jamaica

first_imgRelatedJICA Alumni Association Promotes its Activities in Jamaica Advertisements RelatedJICA Alumni Association Promotes its Activities in Jamaica RelatedJICA Alumni Association Promotes its Activities in Jamaicacenter_img JICA Alumni Association Promotes its Activities in Jamaica UncategorizedDecember 16, 2006 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Alumni Association Central Chapter recently held a promotional exhibition and dinner in observance of its activities in Jamaica.The event, held on Wednesday, December 13, comprised a tour of the Wellness Centre, the Mandeville Hospital, and the Southern Regional Health Authority’s office by Japanese Ambassador, His Excellency Masahiro Obata; an exhibition displaying work done by members of the association throughout the years, particularly since March of this year, and a dinner at the Bloomfield Great House in Mandeville.At the function, Ambassador Obata said he was “pleased to be associated with the people of Manchester and the many who provide good health services”. He added “I am impressed with this initiative . which addresses the maintenance of health for individuals living with chronic lifestyle diseases.I am aware that the wellness programme has been targeting the age group 35 and over, a group that eats more and exercises less,” Mr. Obata stated.Mr. Obata however expressed concern about the unhealthy lifestyles of the younger generation. “I fear that the very young are scarcely concerned about wellness as they are not convinced that they too must prepare for the stage of advanced youth. It is therefore my hope that this programme will extend itself even more in the future to address wellness for all in the Southern region,” he said.The Japanese Ambassador further expressed the hope that “this programme will help many persons to become more aware of their wellness status and no doubt many will prevent serious health threats, as well as eliminate those that have already started”.He pointed out that the Government of Japan’s commitment to the programme was unwavering, as it sought to promote a concept of ‘health for all’ which was aligned with the Ministry of Health’s mission.The Ambassador congratulated the members of the association for sustained participation in the wellness programme, as well as the Southern Regional Health Authority for being so accepting of the JICA effort. “I am confident that this programme will be a success and the facilities, such as the Wellness Centre, will soon become common place across Jamaica,” he said.Meanwhile, President of the JICA Alumni Association Central Chapter, Yvonne Pitter said the alumni chapter had made significant accomplishments within the three years and congratulated members for their “high-spiritedness and for working hard to keep the chapter alive and well”.The JICA Alumni Association in Jamaica comprises persons who returned from technical training and programmes for the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases, in Japan. The association, formed on March 2, 1998 as a non-profit organization, is gradually expanding as its membership increases through the Kingston, Central and Western chapters.last_img read more

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Minister Spencer Promises Faster Response to Development Plans

first_imgMinister Spencer Promises Faster Response to Development Plans UncategorizedNovember 22, 2007 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The government is putting the necessary measures in place to facilitate a faster response time to development plans submitted to the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA).Health and Environment Minister, Rudyard Spencer, said that these measures, which will drive the initiative to give developers a response to their application within 90 days, will include the setting up of a “one-stop agency where NEPA and all the relevant players and board members involved in the decision making process will be in one place”.Mr. Spencer, who was speaking at the opening of a two-day strategic planning retreat for agencies and department under the Ministry held at the Caymanas Golf and Country Club in St. Catherine, said that the country cannot afford to have developmental plans taking between six months up to a year and a half to receive approval from NEPA.“We must ensure that once you bring your plan in for approval, within three months of delivery, you must be given an answer, whether you have more things to do or we’re looking over it and it’s going to take another two weeks or three months, but within three months, there has to be a response to the developer,” he stated.The Minister stated that failure to comply will see the developer being authorized to proceed with the development. RelatedMinister Spencer Promises Faster Response to Development Plans RelatedMinister Spencer Promises Faster Response to Development Planscenter_img Advertisements RelatedMinister Spencer Promises Faster Response to Development Planslast_img read more

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Ex-Trump campaign adviser Papadopoulos reports to prison

first_imgHomeFeaturedEx-Trump campaign adviser Papadopoulos reports to prison Nov. 27, 2018 at 5:00 amFeaturedNewsEx-Trump campaign adviser Papadopoulos reports to prisonAssociated Press3 years agoapFBIGeorge PapadopoulosNewstrump MICHAEL BALSAMOAssociated PressFormer Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos began serving his two-week prison sentence on Monday after a judge rejected his last-minute bid to remain free.Papadopoulos arrived at a minimum-security camp in Oxford, Wisconsin, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons.Papadopoulos, the first campaign aide sentenced in Mueller’s investigation, triggered the Russia investigation two years ago. He was sentenced in September for lying to the FBI about his interactions with Russian intermediaries during the 2016 presidential campaign.He had sought a postponement of his prison term until an appeals court ruled in a separate case challenging the constitutionality of special counsel Robert Mueller’s appointment.But U.S. District Court Judge Randolph Moss said Papadopoulos had waited too long to contest his sentence.The White House has said Papadopoulos, 31, was a low-level volunteer on the campaign. But he’s been a central figure in the Russia investigation dating before Mueller’s May 2017 appointment.According to an indictment handed up this summer, Russian intelligence had stolen emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign and other Democratic groups by April 2016, the same month Papadopoulos was informed by a professor that Russian officials had told him they had “dirt” on Clinton in the form of “thousands of emails.”Papadopoulos later used his connections with the Maltese professor, Joseph Mifsud, and other Russian nationals in an attempt to broker a meeting between then-candidate Donald and Russian President Vladimir Putin.Papadopoulos admitted last year to lying to the FBI about those contacts with Russians and Russian intermediaries.In recent months, Papadopoulos has spent many nights posting on Twitter, venting anger about the FBI and insisting he was framed by the government. He also has offered to testify before the Senate intelligence committee, which is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election, if he’s granted immunity or other conditions.“The truth will all be out. Not even a prison sentence can stop that momentum,” Papadopoulos tweeted Sunday. “Looking forward to testifying publicly shortly after. The wool isn’t going to be pulled over America’s eyes forever.”Papadopoulos’ sentence, issued by Moss on Sept. 7, was far less than the maximum six-month sentence sought by the government but more than the probation that Papadopoulos and his lawyers had asked for. Moss at the time noted that many similar cases resulted in probation but said he imposed a sentence of incarceration partly to send a message to the public that people can’t lie to the FBI. Tags :apFBIGeorge PapadopoulosNewstrumpshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentSanta Monica Police Department Receives Traffic Education and Enforcement GrantMexico to up border security after migrants try to crossYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall9 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson20 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter20 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor20 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press20 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press20 hours agolast_img read more

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Mental health issues in LA’s homeless population is a “humanitarian crisis”

first_imgTags :Coley KinghomelessnessJonathan SherinL.A. County Department of Mental Healthmental healthvenice family clinicshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentHopeful signs as California adds 141,000 jobs in FebruaryLions RoarYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall5 hours agoEntertainmentLifeNoteworthyTales of Two DaughtersCharles Andrews11 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson16 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter16 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor16 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press16 hours ago HomeFeaturedMental health issues in LA’s homeless population is a “humanitarian crisis” Mar. 29, 2021 at 6:00 amFeaturedHealthLifeNewsPeopleMental health issues in LA’s homeless population is a “humanitarian crisis”Clara Harter2 months agoColey KinghomelessnessJonathan SherinL.A. County Department of Mental Healthmental healthvenice family clinicCrisis: The Clinic is working on the mental health component of the crisis. Courtesy photo As LA’s homeless count increases every year, so does the number of unhoused individuals with acute mental health issues, creating what Venice Family Clinic calls a “humanitarian crisis” on the city’s streets. Venice Family Clinic is the largest street medicine provider and offers a range of supportive mental and physical health services to an ever growing homeless clientele. Dr. Coley King, VFC’s director of homeless health care, says the County’s failure to provide adequate shelter to move people off the streets is a contributing force behind this crisis. “Being in the street, in and of itself, is a highly traumatic experience,” said King. “So those individuals who are in the streets in general will suffer from some type of post traumatic syndrome, develop depression, develop anxiety, develop addictions, which can lead to many other challenges.”While some individuals fall into homelessness due to mental health issues, King said that this is only the case for a minority of unhoused individuals. From his years of experience working on the streets he has found that the majority of people fall into homelessness due to socioeconomic factors. He said that life on the streets will then lead to or exacerbate mental illness and addiction issues. Venice Family Clinic has a range of strategies to tackle these issues. Their street medicine teams have been bringing service directly to homeless individuals for years, while a newly launched mobile medicine van allows them to perform lab tests, examinations, and vaccinations on site.Unfortunately, these services can only do so much to stem the rising tide of mentally ill homeless individuals.In order to address this issue the L.A. County Department of Mental Health is trying to build a new mental health response and treatment system. The department director Jonathan Sherin has big goals for this transformation, but said the department lacks the resources to tackle the full scope of the issue. “We have a humanitarian crisis in our country. Los Angeles County and the City of Los Angeles are the epicenter of that humanitarian crisis,” said Sherin. “How dare we not at the federal level and the state level and the local level make this a disaster response of the highest order?”Part of the problem is that the burden of responding to mental health crises has been largely placed on law enforcement officers, while this is neither their primary role nor a job they have been trained for. Sherin calls for a three step revamping of the County’s approach to mental health.The first step is creating a regional call center designed to respond to mental health crises. Next, health and human services’ response needs to be ramped up so that psychiatric mobile response teams can be deployed in real time. The final piece is providing individuals experiencing a mental health crisis with a place to go that is not limited to jail or an emergency room. “We have a mental health pandemic on our hands and are seeing so many different challenges that I believe are just beginning to ratchet up,” said Sherin. “We as a country and as a state must treat mental health and addictions challenges with the same level of resources that we do physical health challenges.”While both Coley and Sherin noted that awareness of the importance of funding mental health services is growing, they fear this attitude shift is not happening fast enough. [email protected]last_img read more

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Family Ties and Cowboy Boots

first_img Email As long as Mark Pirrie and Susan Munsinger can remember, they’ve known the scent and creak of new leather boots and the shine and pride of silver belt buckles.It’s to be expected, since Pirrie and Munsinger – Mark’s sister whose maiden name is Pirrie – basically grew up in Western Outdoor and Norm’s News in Kalispell, both businesses having been in the family for decades.“I was born and raised here,” Mark Pirrie said last week, sitting in Norm’s News.At 45, Pirrie was born just a year after his father, Gordon Pirrie, purchased Western Outdoor in 1970 with a business partner. Forty-six years later, the family clothing and retail business is still going strong, with a customer base reaching back generations.“Some people say that when they get off the plane, this is one of their first stops, Western Outdoor,” Mark Pirrie said.Earlier this month, Mark Pirrie was honored at the Kalispell Chamber of Commerce’s annual banquet as the 2016 Businessman of the Year. The previous year, Munsinger was the Businesswoman of the Year. The awards highlight business acumen, but also a dedication to contributing to the community in meaningful ways.That’s been a tradition at Western Outdoor for as long as the family has owned it, Mark Pirrie said, with support for local 4-H and other agricultural programs going back years.“Instead of black-and-white pictures of the 4-H animals we bought at the fair, now we have color photos,” Mark Pirrie said with a laugh.Gordon Pirrie bought Western Outdoor as a way to avoid leaving Montana. Before he moved to Kalispell, Gordon Pirrie was living in Billings, where his family had a ranch and he worked on the Continental Oil pipeline.“I didn’t want to live in the South or the East,” Gordon Pirrie said. “The opportunity was over here.”He bought the store, which was started by Jack Taylor, Archie Roe, Ace McCown, and Ben Bolton. Taylor and Roe also had a popular men’s clothing store downtown, and Gordon Pirrie remembers Norm’s News as just one of many soda fountains on Main Street.After a few years, Gordon Pirrie followed up with purchasing the connecting buildings that held McIntosh Music – a piano and music store that sat where the boot room now lives – and Norm’s News in the 1980s. Archways – a couple of them original – now connect all three spaces.The upstairs areas of the buildings were in need of repair, he said, and the family spent about $250,000 fixing up the space. Now there are five apartments upstairs, with space for Mark Pirrie’s wife, Beth, to teach flute lessons.Plenty of history occurred within the walls of those buildings, Gordon Pirrie noted. For example, the basement at Norm’s used to be a dirt-floor gun range, with chunks of wood in the wall full of lead. It wasn’t cemented for years, he said. The opera house theater once seated more than 1,100 people for the showing of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” in the early 1900s.As kids, Mark and Susan grew up playing and working in the family business. Munsinger left briefly to live in Oklahoma for about half a year, but it only made her realize Kalispell provided the opportunities she sought.“I didn’t know anything different (than this store),” Munsinger said. “I left and then knew I didn’t want to be an employee.”Now, she and Mark are co-owners at Western Outdoor, while Gordon and Beth run Norm’s News. Business still has its ups and downs, Gordon Pirrie said, though the current drop-off in Canadian business is affecting many local stores.Gordon Pirrie said he remembers when the Flathad started courting more Canadians to shop and visit, a move that opened up a new market of buyers in the valley once the northern visitors started buying retail and property here.He also said the valley is currently in one of its growing phases, when the square footage for new retail stores and the population continue to swell, reminding him of when the Kalispell Center Mall was built.“There’s a real influx of people again,” he said.There are new challenges, though, with modern times. A shortage of employees across the valley has hit many businesses, Munsinger said, and Western Outdoor is also still trying to figure out how to exist most effectively with Internet shopping. While the online stores may not be competition in the traditional, brick-and-mortar sense, the money that goes there likely leaves the Flathead Valley.“There’s only so many dollars in this valley,” Munsinger said.“I think people are just being trained to shop differently,” Mark Pirrie said. “We can’t carry everything; we’d have to have a store 30 times this size.”The staff they do hire at Western Outdoor are an aspect of the business that hasn’t changed, the Pirrie family said. While the faces may be different, the same characteristics of caring about the customer and friendliness still reign supreme.That aspect won’t change, the family said, but there are some opportunities on the horizon. They’re looking into private grants and a feasibility study for the future of the upstairs apartments and the opera house, Gordon Pirrie said. Munsinger is trying to find historic pictures of the upstairs area, and asked that anyone who might have one contact her so they can have an idea of how it looked in keeping with historical traditions.But one aspect of the future is certain: The Pirrie family doesn’t plan on uprooting any time soon.“A lot of it is just being able to stay here and make a living, and helping people,” Munsinger said.Western Outdoor is located at 48 S Main St. in Kalispell. For more information, call (406) 756-5818. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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People / Henry Woo takes over as Asia-Pacific chief executive at Hansa Heavy Lift

first_imgBy Alexander Whiteman 09/12/2016 According to a statement, Mr Roehl’s decision to step down was motivated by a desire to return to Europe. As a founding member of the management team, he has been an ever-present at the firm, and Mr Iliffe praised him for his hard work in developing the company.“I am glad that we will continue to have access to his strategic thinking as a board advisor,” added Mr Iliffe. Project cargo shipping line Hansa Heavy Lift has appointed company veteran Henry Woo as its new head of Asia-Pacific, replacing Joerg Roehl who will remain in an advisory capacity.Mr Woo has two decades of experience in supply chain and shipping operations, including roles with Singapore-based BBC Chartering, DHL and DB Schenker. He joined Hansa just after its formation in 2011 with chief executive Roger Iliffe noting that Mr Woo had been with the firm since “day one”.The company, which is headquartered in Hamburg, opened its Singapore office in 2012 and has eight offices globally, including Shanghai, Perth, Sao Paulo, Houston, Monaco, and Dubai. It also has exclusive agents in the UK, Argentina, Colombia, Canada and Korea.“We have relied on Henry’s industry experience, creativity and leadership to build up our strong position within Asia-Pacific,” said Mr Iliffe. “In particular, he has been the leader of our move into more complex transport and installation projects in Asia and led our work with Bumi Armada and BioWave in the past years. We are very excited that he has accepted this new leadership challenge.”last_img read more

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40 scholarships for the Summer School on Technology, Ohrid

first_img40 scholarships for the Summer School on Technology, Ohrid March 2, 2010 Published by Site Default LinkedIn 0 Reddit Tweet Internship Programme of German Business for the countries of the Western Balkans +1 Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYou must be logged in to post a comment. ← MA Scholarships History or English Literature, UKcenter_img Similar Stories Best Places and Tips when Traveling with Friends Share 0 Call for Leadership Positions for the GLOW Camp; YMLP camps 2020 Joint European Summer School on Technology Enhanced Learning 20107 – 11 June 2010, Ohrid, MacedoniaOpen to: PhD studentsDeadline: 26/03/2010The summer school aims to encourage participants to adopt a critical stance in thinking about the role of technologies in providing opportunities for learners and the potential of these opportunities in terms of learning. Work will centre on three research “Grand Challenges”:– Connecting learners– Orchestrating learning– Contextualising learning environments.The summer school provides a learning environment where participants get opportunities to: develop their research skills; increase their knowledge base; collaborate with others in their own and complementary research areas; engage in debate; have access to experts in the field; and discuss their own work.Cost and fundingThe cost is 550 euro (including accommodation, meals, excursions, local transportation to/from airport).JTEL has secured funding to provide scholarship for about 40 PhD (out of the 60 PhD participants) student grants to cover summer school accommodation, catering and events. Applicants should indicate applying for a scholarship in the application (applicants should explicitly mention it in their motivation letter, briefly explaining their circumstances).Application procedureThe online application form are available on the Summer school web page. The applicants should submit following documents:1. a CV outlining their educational background and work experience (maximum one page);2. a letter of motivation (maximum one page);3. a statement explaining how they think they might contribute and in particular how they can contribute to developing the Grand Challenges (max one page)4. a letter of support from their PhD advisor, which should include a statement of the level of support the institution is able to supplyThe applications should be submitted online before 26th March 2010 to Katherine Maillet at: [email protected] detailed info Pocket Enjoy Russian: Summer Language School →last_img read more

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