Have Alaska’s US lawmakers read the Mueller report? We asked.

first_imgI really did. pic.twitter.com/2qtEg7RH5A— Carlos Lozada (@CarlosLozadaWP) May 30, 2019But no one in Alaska’s congressional delegation can rightfully wear that button. Not yet, anyway.If you want to know about Russian interference in the 2016 election and whether there’s evidence President Donald Trump obstructed a federal investigation, former special counsel Robert Mueller says just read the report.“It contains our findings and analysis and the reasons for the decisions we made,” he said May 29. “We chose those words carefully.”But Mueller chose a lot of words — enough to fill 448 pages.“There are sections of it that are just slow, and you’re wading through it,” said Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. She said Tuesday she’s not done, but she’s reading the report cover-to-cover.“I feel like I’ve got an obligation to do so, and so I’m giving it the time,” she said. “You know, you take out the yellow highlighter. You take the pen out. You write notes.”Alaska’s other Republican senator, Sen. Dan Sullivan, isn’t committed to that approach.“I’ve not read the whole thing. It’s almost 500 pages. I’ve read the summary. And my staff’s been reading the whole thing,” Sullivan said Wednesday. He said he’s not sure he’ll read it page-by-page.“Perhaps,” he said. “I have a lot of reading to do.”Sullivan, though, said he has “no doubt” of one of Mueller’s chief findings: That Russia systematically interfered in the 2016 presidential election.The Mueller report spells out Russian actions designed to help candidate Trump and undermine the campaign of Hillary Clinton. Sullivan said U.S. defense and intelligence agencies made sure that didn’t happen again in the 2018 election.“You know, a lot of it’s classified, but particularly in the cyber area, we were not kind of a passive target as we have been in the past,” Sullivan said.Both senators say the entire Trump administration is dedicated to preventing foreign interference in the 2020 presidential election. Everyone, including the president, realizes Russia hasn’t changed its ways, Murkowski said.“It may have been that they didn’t want Clinton before. It could be that in the next election they don’t want Trump,” she said.A spokesperson for Rep. Don Young says the Republican congressman “is reviewing the complete redacted Mueller report.” He didn’t say whether that includes a page-by-page read.Share this story: Federal Government | Nation & World | PoliticsHave Alaska’s US lawmakers read the Mueller report? We asked.June 6, 2019 by Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media Share:Alaska’s congressional delegation: Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Rep. Don Young, and Sen. Dan Sullivan. All three are Republicans. (Photos by Wesley Early/Alaska Public Media and Skip Gray/360 North)Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2019/06/ann-20190605-01.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.The Mueller report has been available for seven weeks now. You can buy it in paperback. You can read it online for free.You can even get an “I read the Mueller report” button for bragging rights.last_img read more

admin

In Washington, an alliance between symphonies and scientists

first_imgHealthIn Washington, an alliance between symphonies and scientists Lev Facher Could we one day use music to diagnose disease? From left, opera singer Renee Fleming, NIH Director Francis Collins, and former U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy at a panel discussion over the weekend at the Kennedy Center. Jeffery DelViscio/STAT At one point Friday night, Folds tinkered with a baby grand piano and exhorted sections of the National Symphony Orchestra to turn his improvised keystrokes into a quick-turn symphonic arrangement and a standing ovation — a demonstration of how the mind works while improvising.Unlike in a typical concert, the weekend’s many musical performers shared their stages with scientists talking about the mechanisms behind the music — explaining, for instance, how music can change the length and width of a patient’s arcuate fasciculus, a neural pathway made up of fiber bundles in the brain“The brain is a giant pattern detector,” McGill University neuroscientist Daniel Levitin said as the orchestra waited behind him to play its next notes, “and it picks up these patterns in the world wherever they occur. The precise region of the brain that detects these patterns is right up here in the prefrontal cortex — it detects temporal patterns.”Ben Folds plays a musical improvisation based off of audience suggestions with the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center. Dom Smith/STATThe concerts that did not feature traditionally scientific explanations — from the likes of prominent neuroscientists including Levitin, Northwestern’s Nina Kraus, and UCSF’s Charles Limb — featured medical ones.Collins and Vivek Murthy (the U.S. surgeon general until President Trump fired him in April) also participated in the concert-lecture hybrids, and in a panel on music’s role in public health moderated by Fleming.The collaboration’s highlights included the National Symphony Orchestra’s performance of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. The musicians paused to highlight the four-note riff the composition is famous for — before Levitin took the stage to explain.“The brain pretty much knows when the next note will be,” he said. “But it doesn’t know what it will be. A skillful composer has to reward your expectations some of the time, but cleverly violate them once in awhile in order to hold your interest. So Beethoven is toying with your powers of prediction.” Ben Folds and the music in his mindVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/06/06/science-music-kennedy-center/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0002:3302:33  Ben Folds sits down with Daniel Levitin, a neuroscientist and musician, to talk about how Folds’s brain lets him make music. Dominic Smith, Jeff DelViscio/STAT Moments later, Limb took the microphone and displayed a video of himself tinkering on his own keyboard — while he was in an MRI machine — so that he could measure the impact his playing had on his brain activity.One parent, in a panel moderated by Indiana University music therapy researcher Sheri Robb, recounted the years and dollars spent on traditional means of therapy for his child on the autism spectrum. It was music therapy, in the end, that helped the child overcome his developmental delays and overcome his “tactile defensiveness.Then came the story of Forrest Allen, who as a high school student in 2011 suffered a brain injury while snowboarding and whose parents, once he awoke from a coma, were not sure he would regain his ability to speak.His music teacher-turned-music therapist, Tom Sweitzer, recalled at first eliciting only a movement from Allen’s pinkie when he played guitar at his hospital beside.“Every little thing was a triumph,” Sweitzer recalled. “Every time he blew air through a recorder.”But the sessions soon turned more formally to music therapy, all the way from Allen singing along briefly to individual notes to eventually singing along to show tunes months later.“Thankfully, I can walk and move and speak,” Allen said, “most likely because of Tom.” This is how music gets into your brainVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/06/06/science-music-kennedy-center/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:5401:54  Dr. Charles Limb, a surgeon and a musician, shows exactly how your brain takes in music and converts it to something you can understand. Dominic Smith, Jeff DelViscio/STAT But the event extended far beyond individual testimonials to the role music can play in health and healing.For Collins, the man running the nation’s largest research agency, “music was just something that you did growing up,” he said during his Saturday panel with Murthy. And while Murthy did not grow up guitar in hand, he too cited music as an element in the post-administration life he has only recently begun to plan, describing the “toolbox” he wishes to use in his quest to improve the country’s emotional health.“There are some places medicine can’t reach,” Murthy said. “As I was sitting there last night, I thought to myself: We have to include music and the arts in our toolbox for how to improve emotional well-being.”Accordingly, the NIH’s recently announced “All of Us” research program will ask one million Americans about the factors that contribute to good health, from genome sequencing to wearing sensors to detect physical activity — and potentially, to the arts.“They want to be asked other things,” Collins said. “Let’s find out what role music is playing in their lives.” The events followed a January gathering on the same theme at the NIH’s campus in Maryland.advertisement WASHINGTON — What do a Supreme Court justice, the director of the National Institutes of Health, and a four-time Grammy-winning opera singer discuss over dessert?Nothing, actually. They just sing Bob Dylan.It was at a dinner party two years ago when that trio got together — Antonin Scalia, NIH Director Francis Collins, and Renee Fleming — and found themselves singing a rendition of “The Times They Are a-Changin.’” But the gathering, as Collins recalled before a packed concert hall Friday night, also made him and Fleming, an artistic advisor to the Kennedy Center, realize there was an opportunity to work together to explore the crossover between their two fields: science and music.advertisement Tags neurologyresearch That partnership that came to life this weekend at the Kennedy Center, with a series of events that featured major names in neuroscience and music (including Ben Folds and jazz virtuoso Esperanza Spalding) and that was aimed at explaining how scientists are beginning to gain a clearer picture of how the brain processes music — and how doctors are applying their findings. [email protected] By Lev Facher June 6, 2017 Reprints Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. Related: @levfacher About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

admin

Pharmalittle: Sanofi pushes for dengue vaccine approval in India; Novo and Lilly step up diabetes battle

first_img Tags pharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+Vaccines @Pharmalot Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What is it? Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Rise and shine, everyone. The middle of the week is upon us. Have heart, though. You made it this far, so why not hang on for another couple of days, yes? And what better way to make the time fly than to keep busy. So grab that cup of stimulation — our flavor today boasts the aroma of blueberries — and get started. Meanwhile, do keep us in mind if you hear anything interesting. Have a smashing day …Sanofi (SNY) will continue to seek a waiver for running a Phase 3 clinical trial in India for its dengue vaccine, citing “public health” as a reason to bring the Dengvaxia to market as soon as possible, The Economic Times reports. For the last two years, the drug maker has sought a waiver, but has not been able to convince regulators to clear the vaccine without the trials in the country. Sanofi submitted Phase 3 data from trials run in other countries. Pharmalot Ed Silverman What’s included?center_img By Ed Silverman Dec. 6, 2017 Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. About the Author Reprints Alex Hogan/STAT Pharmalittle: Sanofi pushes for dengue vaccine approval in India; Novo and Lilly step up diabetes battle [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.last_img read more

admin

Health Matters: A Grateful Heart

first_imgAdvertisementTags: cardiologyDr. Paul DiGiorgiHealth MattersheartLee Healthshipley cardiothoracic centersurgery “I knew I was gone, no question. I couldn’t breathe. This has been going on for a long time,” said Mohamed Elouardigi, a patient at the Shipley Cardiothoracic Center. For years, Mohamed suffered from symptoms caused by atrial fibrillation, also known as A-Fib.“Not everyone is symptomatic from atrial fibrillation but some people really have a hard time with A-Fib,” explained Dr. Paul DiGiorgi, a cardiothoracic surgeon at Lee Health.A-Fib symptoms can include heart palpitations, fatigue, and difficulty breathing. Mohammed had tried previous treatments to get symptoms under control but with no relief—he was starting to lose hope until Dr. DiGiorgi recommended the MAZE procedure.“He said, Mohamed, I’m going to take care of you, and he explained it to me, and he was so nice, so incredibly clear about what was going to happen,” said Mohamed. Health Matters: Helping Children with Chest Wall Malformation June 13, 2021 Health Matters: A Partnership in Medical Care June 13, 2021 Health Matters: Managing the Stress of COVID-19 June 7, 2021 AdvertisementThe minimally invasive surgical approach uses ablation therapy to help control A-Fib symptoms. “We know that by treating the atrial fibrillation, we can increase their quality of life, prolong their life and significantly reduce their risk of stroke in the future,” said Dr. DiGiorgi.Today, Mohamed is enjoying his new lease on life. “I don’t have any problems breathing. I do not have heart palpitations. I feel like I am 17 or 18 years old again. It’s a miracle and I owe it all to Dr. DiGiorgi and his staff,” said Mohamed.A lifesaving procedure that’s helping patients regain their health and reclaim their life. Health Matters: Scoliosis Treatment for Children June 13, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health – Caring People. Inspiring Care.Visit LeeHealth.org Advertisement AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisementlast_img read more

admin

Live Blog: Follow all the action as the Laois hurlers face Dublin in Croke Park

first_img Facebook Live Blog: Follow all the action as the Laois hurlers face Dublin in Croke Park TAGSLaois senior hurlersLaois v DublinLeinster senior hurling championshipLive Blog Facebook WhatsApp The Laois senior hurlers resume competitive inter-county action this evening as they face Dublin in Croke Park at 6pm.Eddie Brennan has handed three Laois players their first championship start for this evening’s Leinster championship quarter-final clash.Clough-Ballacolla’s Ronan Broderick starts at wing-back, Fiachra C-Fennell from Rosenallis in midfield and Colt-Shanahoe’s James Keyes at corner-forward.There is also a return to the Laois colours in championship action for Sean Downey from Ballinakill, Clough-Ballacolla’s Stephen Maher and Rathdowney-Errill’s James Ryan, all of whom either missed last year’s championship campaign or the league earlier this season.Lee Cleere also returns to the senior county team after missing all the league through sickness.From the team that won last year’s Joe McDonagh Cup, there is the likes of Jack Kelly, Matthew Whelan and John Lennon don’t start while Eanna Lyons is recovering from injury, Joe Phelan opted off the panel at the start of 2020.Cha Dwyer wasn’t recalled after initially opting to go travelling this year and not being called back in after the club campaign.This will be Laois’s sixth time to play Dublin under Eddie Brennan – and while they lost five of those, they won the only championship encounter between the teams.In a stunning game last summer, Laois won 1-22 to 0-23 to seal a first All-Ireland quarter final place in 40 years.Dublin are still the hottest of 1/8 favourites with Laois 6/1 and the draw at 14/1. Dublin are -7 on the handicap betting.Follow all the action as it happens below: Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Twitter News WhatsApp SEE ALSO – Hundreds of children left without training facilities as Portlaoise Leisure Centre pitches close due to Level 5 restrictions Pinterestcenter_img Pinterest Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleCoronavirus: Four additional deaths and 859 new cases with seven in LaoisNext articleBrilliant Burke the difference as Laois bow out of Leinster hurling championship Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Electric Picnic By Alan Hartnett – 24th October 2020 Twitter Electric Picnic Home Sport GAA Live Blog: Follow all the action as the Laois hurlers face Dublin… SportGAAHurlingLaois Senior Hurling Teamlast_img read more

admin

Coronavirus: 12 further deaths and 431 new cases – as Ireland to receive extra 545,000 Pfizer vaccines

first_img Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Pinterest Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Facebook Electric Picnic Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months Council Twitter TAGSCoronavirusCovid-19 Pinterest Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Previous article‘No Carlow land’ left in Graiguecullen as 75 remain on the housing waiting listNext articleAll you need to know as the HSE opens online vaccine portal for those aged 65-69 Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. By Alan Hartnett – 14th April 2021 Coronavirus: 12 further deaths and 431 new cases – as Ireland to receive extra 545,000 Pfizer vaccines Electric Picnic WhatsApp Home News Community Coronavirus: 12 further deaths and 431 new cases – as Ireland to… NewsCommunity Facebook There have been 12 further Coronavirus-related deaths and 431 new cases, according to figures released by the health authorities today.Of the deaths reported today, 4 occurred in April, 2 occurred in March and 6 occurred in January.The median age of those who died was 76 years and the age range was 42-91 years.With nine new cases announced today, Laois now has a 14-day incidence rate of 188.9.Of the cases notified today:204 are men / 226 are women70% are under 45 years of ageThe median age is 33 years old160 in Dublin, 50 in Kildare, 34 in Donegal, 21 in Meath, 20 in Limerick and the remaining 146 cases are spread across 20 other countiesAs of 8am today, 192 COVID-19 patients are hospitalised, of which 49 are in ICU. 13 additional hospitalisations in the past 24 hours.As of April 12th, 2021, 1,076,216 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Ireland:758,763 people have received their first dose317,453 people have received their second doseThe COVID-19 Dashboard provides up-to-date information on the key indicators of COVID-19 in the community including daily data on Ireland’s COVID-19 Vaccination Programme.New Cases in LaoisApril 13 – 9April 12 – 6April 11 – 12April 10 – 2April 9 – 15April 8 – 7April 7 – 13April 6 – 6April 5 – 12April 4 – 7April 3 – 12April 2 – 20April 1 – 27March 31 – 16March 30 – 1414-day case rate in Laois per 100,000 populationApril 13 – 188.9April 12 – 196April 11 – 201.9April 9/10 – Not ProvidedApril 8 – 231.4April 7 – 240.6April 6 – 232.6April 5 – 244.4April 2/3/4 – Not ProvidedApril 1 – 222March 31 – 210.2March 30 – 197.2New cases in Laois during past 14 daysApril 13 – 160April 12 – 166April 11 – 171April 10 – 195April 9 – 211April 8 – 196April 7 – 204April 6 – 197April 5 – 207April 2/3/4 – Not ProvidedApril 1 – 188March 31 – 178March 30 – 167Ireland to receive extra 545,000 Pfizer vaccines The EU is to receive 50 million more doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in the next three months, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has said.She said the EU is turning more heavily to BioNTech/Pfizer to make up for suspended Johnson & Johnson vaccine doses and for longer-term needs to fight the mutating coronavirus.Taoiseach Micheál Martin tweeted that Ireland would receive an extra 545,000 doses, with delivery to begin this month.The move will help to make up for the shortfall of the J&J jabs that were meant to start rolling out, Ms von der Leyen said in a televised statement.SEE ALSO – Funeral arrangements announced for Laois teenager following sad passinglast_img read more

admin

Ryu Takes Both Barrels

first_img Kang Mi JinKang Mi JinKang Mi Jin is a North Korean defector turned journalist who fled North Korea in 2009. She has a degree in economics and writes largely on marketization and economy-related issues for Daily NK. Questions about her articles can be directed to [email protected] Ryu Takes Both Barrels News Facebook Twitter SHARE RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest North Korea has directly targeted Minister of Unification Ryu Woo Ik in its ongoing assault on the basis of South Korea’s policy of ‘flexibility’.Chosun Central News Agency (KCNA), citing Cabinet publication Minju Chosun, renewed the attack today, calling Ryu (though without using his name) a mirror image of the reviled former Minister of Unification Hyun In Taek.Minju Chosun reportedly stated, “The man in charge of the Ministry of Unification claims to support a policy of flexibility just to show that he is different to Hyun In Taek; however, as a few months drifted by the actual nature of the flexible policy clearly appeared”“This flexible policy is merely the word ‘flexible’ added to the original version of the conservative authorities’ policy toward North Korea, leaving as-is the May 24th Measures which are blocking inter-Korean relations improvements and only hoodwinking domestic and international public opinion,” it contended. It reserved particular scorn for Ryu’s suggestions of flexibility in non-political areas, noting that “None of the problems in inter-Korean relations can be solved by narrowing the situation down to apolitical exchanges and humanitarian activities.”“If the South Chosun authorities actually hope to improve inter-Korean relations then their policy of confrontation which denounces peoples of the same race must be rebuilt from top to bottom,” it concluded.center_img News Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak News By Kang Mi Jin – 2011.12.08 3:22pm News North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with Chinalast_img read more

admin

RBCGAM hires head of real estate equity investments

first_img TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news PenderFund names new SVP for investments Toronto-based RBC Global Asset Management (RBCGAM) has appointed Michael Kitt as head, real estate equity investments, the company announced Monday.Based in Toronto and reporting to Dan Chornous, chief investment officer of RBCGAM, Kitt will be responsible for leading the firm’s efforts to develop Canadian real estate pooled solutions, which will initially be offered to the domestic institutional market, with the aim of expanding both vehicle type and targeted client groups over time. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Toronto skyline from center island rgbspace/123RF CETFA elects new board leader Keywords Real estate,  AppointmentsCompanies RBC Global Asset Management Kitt’s appointment marks RBCGAM’s entry into direct real estate equity investing and demonstrates the firm’s continued focus on private and illiquid markets, the company says in a news release.RBCGAM currently has more than $7 billion in assets under management in private markets through its mortgage portfolios.“As a full spectrum asset manager, we continually broaden the range of investment solutions available to our clients,” says. Chornous in a statement. “Commercial real estate is an ideal next step for us, extending out from our mortgage business and offering our clients exposure to an asset class in which RBC GAM’s sophisticated knowledge, scale and access to deal flow will enhance investment prospects.”Kitt has extensive experience in the North American and European real estate business. Most recently, he was chief financial officer & executive vice president, finance and strategy for Oxford Properties, OMERS’ wholly owned real estate investment unit. Prior to that he held positions at Cadillac Fairview Corporation and Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan Board, all related to commercial real estate investing in Canada and the United States.Kitt holds a B. Comm. (honours with distinction) with a major in finance from the University of Manitoba and was awarded the CFA designation in 1995. IE Staff last_img read more

admin

Small Farmers Benefit from Black Tank Irrigation Project

first_imgSmall Farmers Benefit from Black Tank Irrigation Project AgricultureJune 12, 2009 RelatedSmall Farmers Benefit from Black Tank Irrigation Project RelatedSmall Farmers Benefit from Black Tank Irrigation Project RelatedSmall Farmers Benefit from Black Tank Irrigation Projectcenter_img Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Small farmers from several districts in St Catherine have received water tanks and irrigation equipment to establish drip irrigation systems on their farms.The farmers received the systems at concessionary rates, and are only required to repay a portion of the cost over a two year period. These farmers are outside of the areas serviced by the National Irrigation Commission’s (NIC) systems and many have to carry water by hand to their fields.They include Hazel Tenn, from Benbow, St. Catherine, who told the JIS News that she has been carrying water from a water hole that she dug close to her field to water the sweet pepper, dasheen and tomatoes she is farming.“It is very hard. When I heard about this Black Tank programme I was very appreciative. The stress is now over,” she celebrated.Speaking at the handover ceremony for the tanks, Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Dr. Christopher Tufton, congratulated the Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) and the National Irrigation Commission (NIC), who are partners in the initiative.He expressed the hope that it will set the stage for other entities to follow, as water is a critical ingredient in the transformation of the sector and the programme could help farmers to overcome some of their challenges.Minister Tufton said more farmers needed to move away from planting by rainfall, to better respond to the needs of the market.“The Ministry is encouraging farmers to grow what people want, in the quantities that they want, without gluts and shortages and unstable pricing. Drip irrigation is one measure to achieve this, and produce more crops from the same amount of land, thereby increasing productivity,” he added.He said that this was the main aim of the Black Tank project.last_img read more

admin

Cocoa Farmers in St. Mary Aim to Resuscitate Production

first_imgRelatedCocoa Farmers in St. Mary Aim to Resuscitate Production FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Cocoa farmers and manufacturers in St. Mary will be uniting their efforts to resuscitate cocoa production in the parish.Manager of the Richmond Cocoa Fermentary, Lance Jones, said that the farmers were energised by a technical forum held earlier this month, and are fully committed to resuscitating the cocoa industry in order to take full advantage of the lucrative markets, which exist for the product both locally and abroad.The three-day forum, organised by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, the Cocoa Industry Board, and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), was aimed at promoting greater production and productivity in the Jamaican cocoa industry.The event, which comprised a discussion session in Kingston and a field day at the Orange River Agricultural Research Station in Highgate, facilitated information exchange and technical offerings. The objective was to increase knowledge about cocoa production and encourage the farmers to play their part in the drive to resuscitate the industry.Mr. Jones said that the knowledge gained from the forum will play a critical role in the efforts to boost productivity.He said that cocoa production in St. Mary has been on the decline in recent years, but there was still potential for the sector to regain the success of the past.He noted there are many traditional farmers in the parish, who are interested in returning to the glory days, while many young farmers see cocoa farming as a profitable venture and are willing to become involved in the industry.The Cocoa Industry Board, he said, is fully supportive of the farmers’ efforts and has pledged to work closely with them. RelatedCocoa Farmers in St. Mary Aim to Resuscitate Production Cocoa Farmers in St. Mary Aim to Resuscitate Production AgricultureJuly 21, 2009center_img RelatedCocoa Farmers in St. Mary Aim to Resuscitate Production Advertisementslast_img read more

admin