Nuclear Training

first_imgNuclearReactors Nuclear Training McGhee is working to establish programs with standards set by INPO where performance would be measured by the local utility. “In the past, we have not conducted this type of educational program since most community colleges weren’t charged with training,” he said. Now that two-year schools are partnering with the utilities, TVA training managers monitor class curriculum, syllabi, performance standards and so on. “The standards of a training program are very detailed, so schools must outline exact competencies and specific classes in which each competency will be covered,” he said. Linkedin But another industry sector should also benefit: nuclear training. Tim McGhee, dean of Engineering Technology at Chattanooga State Community College in Chattanooga, Tenn., said he believes the nuclear renaissance was kicked off in earnest with these recent loan guarantees. He said his college is excited as it had a jump in developing training for existing clients. Twitter The loan guarantees would help finance new reactors such as those at the Alvin W. Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in eastern Georgia. This would be a most welcome project for the surrounding economy as construction is expected to create some 3,400 construction jobs and 800 permanent jobs once the reactors are up and running. “It’s a great show of confidence by the utility to give our students this opportunity and it’s a great opportunity for the utility to pass some of its training to Chattanooga State,” he said. Mark Rauckhorst, utilities managing director for PricewaterhouseCoopers in Atlanta said he sees the new construction as a sign of industry expansion and, more specifically, training to support the expansion. In February 2010 after touring a clean jobs training facility in Lanham, Md., President Obama delivered a speech stating that his administration had approved $8.3 billion in new loan guarantees to build nuclear power facilities. His audience included electrical and communication workers who stood to benefit from the construction of such facilities. Synlo said that the nuclear industry added a new initiative a few years ago to put in place an online infrastructure and curriculum for common training that all nuclear power plant contractors are required to take. Mark Rauckhorst said, however, the loan guarantees will not in and of themselves create a boom in nuclear training. It will only be a true boom if more plants are started. “Two years ago we started working with the industry— specifically, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)—so we’ve already started, but now it will be accelerated,” he says. “The announcement reinforces the need to ensure the industry has a properly trained workforce, but a boon in demand will only exist if more plants are started,” he said. The Vogtle facility is currently staffing a training department to conduct classroom, laboratory, shop and simulator training for most of the new staff of Vogtle Units 3 and 4, said Charlie Nesbitt, AP1000 Training Deployment Manager in the Nuclear Development Organization at Southern Nuclear. Vogtle is to be staffed with about 60 instructors, supervisors and specialists, who will go on to train and manage other personnel as the plant is built. Loan Guarantees and Training Training can take many forms and organizations that make their living from training people, such as schools and training companies, stand to benefit from nuclear expansion. The expansion also opens up opportunities for innovations in training and for the industry to continue improving on its already existing high quality standards. “The guarantees will allow utilities to invest in new plant construction, which will employee thousands of people either full-time or part-time during the construction period,” he said. When the plants are up and running, each plant employs a full-time workforce of 600 to 800 people. These employees will be trained on the same federally mandated, highly structured training requirements that all nuclear plants have. Every nuclear plant also employs several hundred temporary workers for a short period of time every year when they shut down to refuel and perform other maintenance duties. These workers receive training as well, but generally to a lesser degree than full-time plant employees. He said the net result in building new nuclear power plants will be an increase in the number of people who will receive training every year, but not necessarily the amount of training each persons. The delay in some project starts, caused in part due to the economic downturn, has been a much more manageable exercise. “Training for the new units is based on a strong training foundation established and implemented for the existing plants,” said Rauckhorst. This is an issue which has been reviewed and planned for by the industry for several years. Already new training platforms have been established to provide potential candidates with the proper fundamentals including the use of technical schools who have worked with utilities to develop curriculum to support the new plants. The strong operational and safety performance of the existing plants has provided an opportunity for new people to enter this industry. “We’re taking this right out of the uniform standards,” said McGhee. The school is working on another accredited program for a potential start-up this fall and started other programs not necessarily unique to nuclear power plants but essential to next-generation nuclear power plant construction, such as nondestructive testing and quality assurance/quality control. “We plan to educate and train our students in anticipation of the growth of the industry and the attrition of workforce, which is retiring exponentially faster than it can be replaced,” he said. In building the training program, Southern is training the trainers with certification programs that will span 2011 and beyond. “The first class of Vogtle 3 and 4 operations instructors completed courses in fundamentals, nuclear plant systems and integrated plant operations in 2009,” said Nesbitt. The class also has completed an instructor certification course taught by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). They are currently engaged in plant familiarization at Vogtle 1 and 2. These instructors were scheduled to attend Westinghouse classroom training on AP1000 Systems this spring and Westinghouse simulator training in the spring of 2011. A second class of Vogtle 3 and 4 operations instructors has begun a similar sequence of training, Nesbitt said. Professionals entering in the industry will be trained with the benefit of lessons learned from existing operations. A higher standard of training will subsequently instill greater confidence in the public at large and create more interest and legislative support for nuclear power. The Vogtle projects are putting a new face on the industry. Industry leaders and pundits have faith that an underlying expansion is underway with the intent of creating more new jobs that require professional training. “Initial simulator training will be conducted using a limited scope simulator, which will be ready for training use in early 2012,” said Nesbitt. “A full scope simulator will be available for training in early 2014, prior to operator license exams.” Training programs consist of partnerships with Westinghouse for operations instructors, GSE for pre-training of instructor candidates and operator candidates and a partnership with Augusta Technical College for initial training of non-licensed operators and the maintenance disciplines. Chattanooga State has worked on forging a partnership with TVA that has facilitated training readiness. The utility is coming to the school with its need to build a curriculum. Public support will remain, Rauckhorst said, “as long as the plants—both existing and new—can continue to demonstrate this type of performance.” Training Innovation “Utilities are developing strategies which will consist of the use of multiple pools of resources,” said Rauckhorst. Some will enter the workforce from the Navy and will come with an understanding of the technology and the operation and will need training in the type of plants being employed commercially. Some will be from the existing fleet operations so they have an understanding of the operations requirements and safety culture that is critical to this industry. Some will enter the industry for the first time. “Each will require fundamental training in the technology and how the systems operate,” he said. “The expectations and requirements will remain consistent with today’s operations staff.”center_img Facebook By Jim Romeo, Freelance Writer He cited Chattanooga State’s Radiation Protection program as an initiative with specific plant standards that must be met. “TVA provides internship opportunities through Bartlett Nuclear Services to help train students in the processes,” said McGhee. This way, students are in the position to perform real-world tasks under the mentorship and guidance of experienced radiation protection professionals. Nuclear-related training programs are unique due to third-party curricular standards set by INPO. Schools like McGhee’s usually don’t have to worry about meeting any specific industry standards, so this is different from the way business has been done in the past. Facebook “This would be similar to General Employee Training (GET),” said Synlo. This infrastructure, the National Academy for Nuclear Training e-Learning (NANTeL), aims to minimize the need for contractors to repeatedly take training that is common across the industry, making it easier for them to do work at different plants. “This infrastructure continues to evolve and gain adoption in the industry,” he said. No posts to display Optimizing Plant Performance: The April POWERGEN+ series activates today Because nuclear safety is such a sensitive issue, training should play a key role to instill confidence in the public and in lawmakers. Confidence in trained professionals using safe practices is important to long-run viability of nuclear power. Safety and quality of personnel, however, begins with recruiting and hiring from the right pool of candidates. “The expansion is underway with active projects in Georgia and South Carolina,” he said. “These projects are paving the way for the exploration and implementation of new training strategies to meet the requirements to effectively construct, manage and operate the new units.” The construction labor force has been in training for a while. In fact, he said, training of operations personnel for the plants scheduled to begin commercial operation in 2016 has already begun. New Jersey utility regulators extend zero-carbon breaks for PSEG nuclear power plants Industry Expansion and “Clean Jobs” “The engagement of local technical colleges to develop and teach fundamentals such as math, science and other core skills has been an effective training initiative,” said Victor Synylo, utilities director for People and Change with PriceWaterhouse Coopers, based in Chicago. “It allows for people local to the plants to be trained and evaluated to determine their aptitude to move forward and has been a great early step and one which can continue to provide new personnel to the industry.” He said the use of local schools is part of the utilities’ efforts to be a partner to the community and continue to support the local areas. “This will be an initiative that will continue to provide a good source of candidates for the plants,” he said. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR McGhee said that community colleges like his see the new construction cycle as an opportunity to be a part of the nuclear industry expansion and also part of a major “clean jobs” expansion. The nuclear renaissance may have begun in earnest with recent federal loan guarantees. Now it’s time to train the workforce that will operate the new plants. Twitter View Power Generation Articles on PennEnergy.com Power Engineerng Issue Archives Previous articleEmissions Reductions at Boswell 3Next articleSTEP receives ABWR chloecox “We’ve seen it already in the Tennessee Valley, with TVA currently finishing its second reactor at Watts Bar.” TVA also recently completed an additional reactor at Browns Ferry, 2.5 hours southwest of Chattanooga, and is considering bringing another reactor online at Bellefonte, an hour south of the city. 6.1.2010 “With about 25 license applications now in the U.S., the expansion is in earnest now and we are on leading edge at Chattanooga State and in this region. We’ve been playing catch up on the education component and are now establishing uniform accredited curricula in accordance with national guidelines set by INPO, which recently established new guidelines.” McGhee said many plants have gotten out of the training business, but now with the renaissance they are beginning to work with two-year colleges to train current and future skilled technicians. More Power Engineering Issue Articles Suitors for halted Bellefonte nuclear project ask TVA to consider climate in reviving sale Linkedin TAGSPE Volume 114 Issue 6SPP By chloecox – last_img read more

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Bureau of Prisons director cutting internet access, technology usage for staff to ‘limit distractions’

first_imgiStock(WASHINGTON) — The Bureau of Prisons will make hiring a main priority in the coming year and will also be cutting internet usage for its employees to “limit distractions,” Director Kathy Hawk Sawyer stressed in an internal email to prison staff that was obtained by ABC News.“Although technology serves us well in many of the security and communication features we utilize, we must not allow technology to be our enemy by taking our eyes and ears off the interactions around us or limit our face-to-face interaction with staff and inmates,” Hawk Sawyer wrote in the email.She added, “Also, internet access on government devices and computers should be used only to complete required daily work. Some internet access will soon be curtailed so that distractions will be eliminated.”While Hawk Sawyer didn’t make a direct reference to the Jeffrey Epstein case, recent court documents said the two officers in charge of watching over the Epstein’s cell were catching up on a sports news site and looking at motorcycle sales, the night the convicted sex offender and financier died at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.One of the biggest issues surrounding the Bureau of Prisons is the lack of staffing required — in some cases, one source described MCC’s staffing to be operating at only half-capacity. Hawk Sawyer addressed the issue head on in her email.“In addition, we are taking a fresh look at what staffing level is correct for each institution,” she said.Hawk Sawyer said Attorney General William Barr made a “personal appeal to [the Office of Personnel Management ] to expedite our request” to hire at the local level.She referenced the need for more focus on the BOP’s Special Housing Units, an area of a prison that houses high profile and problem inmates. Epstein was housed at MCC’s Special Housing Unit when he was found dead in August.“Special Housing Units continue to be a major focus. I commend those of you who work in our SHU units for your renewed commitment to ensuring that we adhere to our policy requirements regarding rounds and counts in SHU. Individual inmates in these units may be particularly vulnerable to suicide and other mental health concerns due to the restrictive environment,” she said.A BOP spokesperson said Hawk Sawyer is focused on a “back to basics” approach, emphasizing sound correctional management.“Her message regarding limiting or removing unnecessary distractions inside Bureau facilities, such as internet access on government devices and computers, or cellular communication using smart watches and other technology, is one of a number of areas under review to enhance on the job safety and security in Bureau institutions,” a spokesperson told ABC News.The spokesperson added, “The need to use such technology, such as the internet to perform vital job functions for specific duties and positions will be reviewed, and access will be tailored accordingly to ensure a safe and professional environment.”A source familiar with the matter said the letter from the director was met with “anger” from rank and file officers. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reservedlast_img read more

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Developers, investors hustle for bulk condo deals

first_imgNew York City developers and investors are seeing an uptick in bulk condo deals, thanks to an already soft market and coronavirus-related distress. (iStock)Danny Fishman cannot keep up with the demand.Danny Fishman, Gaia Real EstateThe investor, who leads Gaia Real Estate, is contending with a deluge of pitches from developers hoping to sell him condo units in bulk. He said the missives began picking up last year but recently have been coming in at such velocity that he hardly has time to look at them.“I would easily say at least 50 percent of new [condo] construction in the city is talking about bulk [sales],” Fishman said.Gaia is in advanced talks to buy five condo packages ranging from 12 units to more than 100 at projects in Manhattan and Brooklyn. All are new deals that appeared since March, when the coronavirus shutdown halted apartment showings and slowed sales to a trickle.Ankit Duggal, RockFarmer Properties“Any time you see a crisis point is usually when you see an opportunity for some kind of bulk buying,” said Ankit Duggal, vice president of acquisition and debt investments at RockFarmer Properties.$1.6BThe total value of 2,295 units sold in bulk deals in NYC between January 2015 and May 2020, according to a TRD analysisThe luxury market was already in strife when the pandemic hit, with $5.7 billion in existing condo inventory at the beginning of the year and another $33 billion worth in the shadows. But now, with sales stalled and financing harder to come by, developers and their partners are looking at any way to move units. Some investors, however, still feel prices aren’t low enough to justify a big bet on New York City’s beleaguered condo market, particularly in light of added stress from a global pandemic and new regulations affecting the rental market, a key part of many bulk buyers’ business models.“It’s almost the same as [if] they’re just surrendering property. If you’re a bulk buyer, you’re trolling around to find the most desperate sponsor.”Dan Hollander, DHA Capital“Right now, everything is a guessing game, which isn’t great when you’re running numbers for these,” said Corey Dyer of Sotheby’s International Realty, whose team has been analyzing deals based on comparisons to other periods of economic uncertainty.“It’s too soon to tell, and I think anybody that tells you otherwise … I don’t know if I can trust them.”The developer’s calculusInterest in bulk deals is out there, but making them happen can be difficult.Sponsors generally forgo the profits they stood to earn from final units sales because bulk deals only happen at below-retail prices.Dan Hollander, DHA Capital“It’s almost the same as [if] they’re just surrendering property,” said developer Dan Hollander. “If you’re a bulk buyer, you’re trolling around to find the most desperate sponsor.”But there are reasons sponsors may go that route.One, said Josh Winefsky of Kramer Levin, is if a loan maturity date were looming and sales were slow. In that case, selling the remaining units might be more appealing than kicking more equity into the project, finding a new partner or refinancing at a potentially higher rate, Winefsky said.Ceruzzi president Art Hooper said he’s been getting calls from bulk buyers interested in the developer’s Upper East Side condominium, the Hayworth, where just two units are in contract. A planned deal for an inventory loan at the site recently stalled because of the pandemic.“There’s no question that the condo market is not robust in New York,” Hooper said in an earlier interview.Vickram Jambu, Lee & AssociatesVickram Jambu of Lee & Associates, who is marketing a bulk package at the Chamberlain condo at 269 West 87th Street, said a common misconception is that bulk offers arise only when a project is in distress. He argues that such deals can be a useful way for a developer to change business strategy. (Jambu declined to comment on the Chamberlain condo specifically. Its developers, Simon Baron and Quadrum Global, also declined to comment.)Winefsky characterized bulk trades as a “deviation” from the sponsor’s business plan, usually because of slow sales.“It’s unlikely that someone goes in thinking, ‘I’m going to sell in bulk,’” he said. “I don’t know that I would say it’s an act of desperation … but it’s in all likelihood not a sign of a very healthy project.”Josh Winefsky of Kramer LevinAnother developer, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said he mostly didn’t take bulk offers too seriously because even though it would be great to move a huge haul of units at once, there is usually a catch.“In a market where there isn’t movement and nothing is sold, most bulk buyers are looking for a significant discount and that sits below the lender’s release price,” the developer said. “So unless you have a lender aligned with a bulk sale, they tend not to happen.”A growing nicheBulk buying has never been a huge driver of New York City’s sales market. An analysis of property records by The Real Deal showed 2,295 units were sold in bulk deals across the five boroughs for $1.6 billion between January 2015 and May 2020.Still, there have been a slew of notable trades in recent years, including Gaia’s 144-unit buy at the Corinthian condo in 2014 for $147 million and Moinian Group’s $27 million sale of 32 apartments at the W Downtown. Last year, Gaia closed on 90 units at the Brodsky Organization’s Bridge Tower Place Condominium for $52 million.Mark Zborovsky, a broker who specializes in selling blocks of converted sponsor units, said the market has been steady for many years. The main change he’s seen since he started out in the 1970s is growth: The market has increased, and prices have gone up.“People were buying blocks for 10, 15 cents on the dollar,” he said of his early days. Now, investors pay between 30 percent and 40 percent of the units’ market value.Read moreContending with Manhattan’s condo crunchResidential contract signings in NYC plummetHFZ’s the XI has considered wholesale deals“We’re considering everything”: Ceruzzi’s UES condo under pressure When bulk deals first gained traction in the 1980s, they were driven by the banks. At the beginning of the decade, a rush of developers came into the condo market. But a change to the tax law in 1986 altered the deductibility of certain investments, depressing real estate values. By the end of the decade, the country was facing a major banking crisis.Andy Gerringer of the Marketing Directors“That’s when the banks took back, for the first time, many, many projects,” said Andy Gerringer of the Marketing Directors. “There were so many condos on the market at that time, and the banks had to get them off their books.”But investors were in short supply. Hedge funds and the private-equity firms weren’t as prevalent in real estate as they are today, Gerringer said. Most of the investors with both the money and appetite for bulk deals came from overseas.That has since changed: Over the years a handful of New York investors and developers such as Myles Horn have teamed up with larger players to buy units cheaply, renovate the apartments and sometimes common spaces and then sell at a markup.Myles HornHorn, who has bought and sold more than 5,000 units in bulk deals over about 40 years, is also seeing more interest in what had been a niche market. The developer and investor is in talks to close on 250 units across multiple co-operative buildings owned by one sponsor. Those negotiations pre-date Covid, but Horn said he has since begun working on another bulk deal, this one at a new condo.“It’s a very, very small business,” he said. “Now everyone and their mother is looking for these deals.”Condo distressIt’s easy to see why Manhattan’s luxury market is ripe for bulk deals. Though it showed signs of life in the early part of this year, Covid-19 quickly scuttled that momentum.“The problem, as I see it, is there has not yet been a realization on the owners or lenders’ part as to how deeply underwater these projects are. I think [buyers] may get burned.”Myles Horn, developerDespite virtual tours and other platforms geared toward contactless deals being rapidly adopted by agents and consumers, the number of new deals has plummeted. In May, Manhattan’s co-op and condo markets saw respective year-over-year drops in contract volume of 80 percent and 83 percent, according to a report from Douglas Elliman and appraisal firm Miller Samuel. Brooklyn’s co-op and condo markets fell 76 percent and 44 percent, respectively.Faced with any combination of those headwinds, exposed lenders and institutional equity investors will often push for bulk sales.Ran Eliasaf of Northwind Group“They are very welcome,” said Ran Eliasaf, managing partner of Northwind Group, an investor-turned-lender that recently launched a $220 million debt fund to originate condo inventory loans for New York City–based projects.“It all depends on the price,” he said, acknowledging that while bulk deals trade at discounts, it’s worth it if the final price matches what the lender underwrote or significantly contributes to paying down a loan.For bulk buyers, price is a major stumbling block too. Historically, the rule of thumb for a bulk discount is 30 percent to 40 percent below retail asking prices, according to Horn. But most bulk offers he’s reviewed have a 10 percent to 15 percent markdown, which he calls “nonsense.”“That’s not the price. It’s in fact their wish list,” he said.Active deals in the market offer some insight into where developers are.Marketing materials for the Chamberlain show the developers are offering an additional 10 percent discount on all 26 remaining apartments at the 38-unit condo.At HFZ Capital’s XI condominium, the Douglas Elliman sales team has held talks about a 10-unit package with a blended discount of 20 percent.“The problem, as I see it, is there has not yet been a realization on the owners or lenders’ part as to how deeply underwater these projects are,” Horn said. “I think [buyers] may get burned … Most of these deals have not yet reached the appropriate discount.”Fishman agreed, noting that Gaia is buying “only on discount.” He said he expects lean years ahead and isn’t counting on the residential market bouncing back anytime soon.“We don’t believe in buying market price and hoping everything will grow with the city,” he said. “We don’t think there will be growth.”Hunting for a bargainAs the country settles into a recession, many in the industry are watching to see if a new wave of bulk deals emerges.“We’re seeing opportunities being offered on the condominiums that have maybe 10, 20 percent sellout and now they’re stuck,” said RockFarmer’s Duggal. “We’re also seeing, on the other side of the trade, distressed debt being sold off on that structure as well.”Duggal said his firm had been looking at deals before the pandemic, including a portfolio of Bronx co-op deals that was marketed last year. But in recent months, more have started to come across their desks.When they underwrite bulk deals, Duggal said his firm considers the debt position of the building and whether there’s a strong market for the product. If the buyer sentiment is negative, he said, they work on the assumption that the units would not sell for a long time, instead focusing on what rents they can achieve.“The upside for us is the condominium sellout,” he said. Renting, though, is always the fallback.In New York City’s notoriously tight rental market, the idea of struggling to find tenants may seem laughable. But these aren’t ordinary times. More than 40 million Americans are unemployed because of the pandemic, and many well-heeled city dwellers have been renting vacation homes.In April, at the height of the pandemic, new rental activity dropped by more than 70 percent to the lowest level since 2009. That means any rental figures bulk buyers are relying on to forecast their income are out-of-date at best.Attorney Mark Hakim also noted that the changes to the rent laws last year, in addition to the specter of the “good cause” eviction bill, which would effectively cap rent increases on market-rate units statewide, may have likewise prompted some investors to think twice about bulk buying in Manhattan.That’s the case for Gaia’s Fishman, who said New York’s eviction moratorium and lack of landlord relief in light of the pandemic has been particularly hard to absorb.“There’s a political risk,” he said. “I will invest in New York only if I’m getting a discount to account for the added risk.”Jambu of Lee & Associates said high-end bulk deals don’t make sense without the sales component.“Typically speaking, the discount is not heavy enough to have the entire business plan predicated on purely rental,” he said. The model, particularly now, is “buy and hold and sell.”But how long can an investor hold a vacant unit to sell it at a profit?“If an investor can come in and carry them for five, 10 years, [these bulk deals] are great buys,” Dyer said.Horn, however, cautioned that bulk buyers should prepare for the worst-case scenario: not being able to sell units.“Nobody knows how long this is going to last … We all think we’re geniuses until we screw up,” said Horn. “The market makes you a bum or a hero.”Write to Sylvia Varnham O’Regan at [email protected] and Erin Hudson at [email protected] This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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Licio Gelli, freemason linked to conspiracies, dies

first_imgHe was also found guilty of obstructing justice during police investigations into an explosion at Bologna train station in 1980 in which 85 people were killed. He later escaped from house arrest and fled to Switzerland.In 1995, a judge linked Gelli with a 1970 plot to instigate a military coup in Italy, but the case was dropped because it was outside the statute of limitations.The P2 was also accused of attempting to halt efforts to save former prime minister Aldo Moro, who was murdered by the Red Brigades leftist group in 1978 after being held hostage for 55 days.Born in 1919, Gelli was a supporter of Benito Mussolini and volunteered to fight for Francisco Franco in the Spanish Civil War. He joined the freemasons in the 1960s and founded  P2 in 1970. A list of alleged members was later discovered by Italian police — with one of those on the list being Silvio Berlusconi, a future prime minister.“I am a fascist and will die a fascist,” Gelli said at a news conference in 1999. Licio Gelli, the mastermind behind a notorious Italian masonic lodge with links to some of Italy’s biggest scandals of the 20th century, has died at the age of 96.Gelli was at the “grandmaster” of the shadowy Propaganda Two (P2), whose activities were exposed in 1981 and which was accused of conspiring with right-wing extremists and the mafia to undermine Italian governments.Gelli was sentenced to 12 years in jail for fraud linked to the collapse of Banco Ambrosiano whose boss, Roberto Calvi — known as “God’s banker” because of his links to the Vatican — was found hanged under a bridge in London in 1982. However, he served little time behind bars.last_img read more

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Cecil Ray Guillote

first_imgCecil Ray Guillote, 74, of Port Neches, Texas passed away Thursday, October 24, 2019 at Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas.Cecil was born August 3, 1945 in Port Neches, Texas to Lloyd Guillote and Helen Lakey Guillote.He was a lifelong resident of Port Neches and a member of Southside Baptist Church in Port Neches. Cecil was a retired Operator with Motiva with 43 years of service and a member of the United Steel Workers.He also served 8 years in the Army National Guard.Funeral service will be held Monday, October 28, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at Southside Baptist Church in Port Neches with Reverend Aaron Little officiating. Burial will follow at Oak Bluff Memorial Park. Visitation for family and friends will be from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. Sunday, October 27, 2019 at Levingston Funeral Home in Port Neches.Surviving relatives include his wife of 26 years, Donna Guillote of Port Neches, Texas; daughter, Keeley Grant and husband Stephen of Port Neches, Texas; sons, Matthew Guillote of Port Neches, Texas, Christopher Guillote of Lumberton, Texas, Brent Bertolio and wife Jessica of Tyler, Texas; sister, Lois Smith of Rocky River, Ohio; brother, Walter Guillote and wife Pam of Spring, Texas; grandchildren, Dustin Hurst, Dylan Guillote, Trinity Guillote, Jonah Bertolio, Katelyn Bertolio, and Noah Bertolio; great grandchildren, Kaya Guillote, Aiden Guillote, and Ava Guillote.last_img read more

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Ealing Half Marathon gets the beers in with Fuller’s

first_imgThe Ealing Half Marathon has announced Fuller, Smith and Turner, the London brewer and premium pub company, as a major sponsor of the event, which takes place on 24 September 2017 and is expected to attract over 7,000 runners on the Sunday together with 1,500 children in the Ealing Mini Mile on the Saturday.“Having partners that share our values and community focus is of paramount importance to us,” said Sandra Courtney, Ealing Half Marathon Race Director. “Fuller’s is a great example of an organisation that recognises the enormous contribution the event has brought to West London and it’s great to have them on board.”Jonathon Swaine, Managing Director of Fuller’s Inns, added, “We are delighted to return as an event partner for the Ealing Half Marathon. Having been involved since the first event in 2012 it’s amazing to see how far the event has grown. Its ethos as a community event, which inspires people and resonates with the values at our brewery and in our pubs, makes it a great event for us to get involved with.“We look forward to helping the event to grow and are keen to see it remaining one of the first events people look for in the calendar – long live the #EalingFeeling!” Related Fuller’s will assist in the marketing and promotion of the event and will have a number of staff and customers taking part on the day. Local Fuller’s pubs will offer runner competitions and organised training runs prior to race day as well as hosting events on the day itself.“We are also delighted to announce that in the build-up to the event there will be a special edition ‘Ealing Half’ guest beer on sale in selected pubs in London”, added Sandra Courtney. “It’s fair to say that one or two of our runners have been known to frequent Fuller’s pubs and I know the attraction of a pint of Ealing Half should prove extremely popular!”The sixth Ealing Half Marathon takes place on Sunday 24 September 2017. The race is looking forward to welcoming runners from over 25 countries keen to experience the #EalingFeeling. The race was voted the UK’s best half marathon in 2014, 2015 and 2016 at The Running Awards, and took home the Silver award in the same category in 2017.The 13.1-mile single lap, traffic-free course takes runners through parts of Central Ealing, Montpelier, Pitshanger, West Ealing, Hanwell and St Stephens before returning to Lammas Park. The Ealing Mini Mile, for young runners aged 6-16, takes place the day before the half marathon, on Saturday 23 September.The lead charities for the 2017 Ealing Half Marathon are Cancer Research UK and Alzheimer’s Society.Entries for the Ealing Half Marathon 2017 are now open. The entry fee is £40 for affiliated runners and £42 for non-affiliated runners. The organisers are expecting the race to sell out by the end of July.www.ealinghalfmarathon.comlast_img read more

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Tiny houses big with U.S. owners seeking economic freedom

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Nina GlinskiDoug Immel recently completed his custom-built dream home, sparing no expense on details like cherry-wood floors, cathedral ceilings and stained-glass windows — in just 164 square feet of living space including a loft.The 57-year-old schoolteacher’s tiny house near Providence, Rhode Island, cost $28,000 — a seventh of the median price of single-family residences in his state.“I wanted to have an edge against career vagaries,” said Immel, a former real estate appraiser. A dwelling with minimal financial burden “gives you a little attitude.” He invests the money he would have spent on a mortgage and related costs in a mutual fund, halving his retirement horizon to 10 years and maybe even as soon as three. “I am infinitely happier.”Dramatic downsizing is gaining interest among Americans, gauging by increased sales of plans and ready-made homes and growing audiences for websites related to the niche. A+E Networks Corp. will air, beginning today, “Tiny House Nation” a series on FYI that “celebrates the exploding movement.” continue reading »last_img read more

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AZRE Magazine January/February 2014

first_imgHere’s Looking At You, 2014Welcome to the first issue of the new year!I’m all for the shiny, new possibility that comes with a new year — I mean, the Arizona Center for Law and Society rendering you see on the cover is going to be not only a valuable asset to the community as a large nonprofit law firm and learning facility but also a really great spot to take my lunch breaks.However, after talking to a few of the industry’s movers and shakers for this year’s annual commercial real estate outlook, it seems more appropriate to greet 2014 with: “In with the old!”Shopping centers all over Arizona are getting longoverdue makeovers to match the changing times, as you can read all about in our International Council of Shopping Centers section. GPEC’s Barry Broome also calls for creative and bold minds to take on challenging in-fill projectsthrough downtown Phoenix in the outlook.Within this issue, you’ll read about great projects in the pipeline and get acquainted with companies worth watching over the next 12 months in our “40 Companies to Watch” feature.We also interview some people who we think will do great things; check out our Q-and-A with the first female NAIOP chairman in Arizona, Liberty Property Trust’s Megan Creecy-Herman.And, before I go, I want to wish you all health and happiness in 2014. I’m excited to see what’s in store.Enjoy the issue,Amanda Ventura, EditorTake it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.last_img read more

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Brain development suffers from lack of fish oil fatty acids, study finds

first_imgShare on Twitter Pinterest Share on Facebook Share LinkedIncenter_img Email While recent reports question whether fish oil supplements support heart health, UC Irvine scientists have found that the fatty acids they contain are vitally important to the developing brain.In a study appearing today in The Journal of Neuroscience, UCI neurobiologists report that dietary deficiencies in the type of fatty acids found in fish and other foods can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life. The findings suggest that women maintain a balanced diet rich in these fatty acids for themselves during pregnancy and for their babies after birth.Susana Cohen-Cory, professor of neurobiology & behavior, and colleagues identified for the first time how deficits in what are known as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids cause molecular changes in the developing brain that result in constrained growth of neurons and the synapses that connect them. These fatty acids are precursors of docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, which plays a key role in the healthy creation of the central nervous system. In their study, which used female frogs and tadpoles, the UCI researchers were able to see how DHA-deficient brain tissue fostered poorly developed neurons and limited numbers of synapses, the vital conduits that allow neurons to communicate with each other.“Additionally, when we changed the diets of DHA-deficient mothers to include a proper level of this dietary fatty acid, neuronal and synaptic growth flourished and returned to normal in the following generation of tadpoles,” Cohen-Cory said.DHA is essential for the development of a fetus’s eyes and brain, especially during the last three months of pregnancy. It makes up 10 to 15 percent of the total lipid amount of the cerebral cortex. DHA is also concentrated in the light-sensitive cells at the back of the eyes, where it accounts for as much as 50 percent of the total lipid amount of each retina.Dietary DHA is mainly found in animal products: fish, eggs and meat. Oily fish – mackerel, herring, salmon, trout and sardines – are the richest dietary source, containing 10 to 100 times more DHA than nonmarine foods such as nuts, seeds, whole grains and dark green, leafy vegetables.DHA is also found naturally in breast milk. Possibly because of this, the fatty acid is used as a supplement for premature babies and as an ingredient in baby formula during the first four months of life to promote better mental development.The UCI team utilized Xenopus laevis (the African clawed frog) as a model for this study because it allowed them to follow the progression and impact of the maternal dietary deficit in the offspring. Because frog embryos develop outside the mother and are translucent, the researchers could see dynamic changes in neurons and their synaptic connections in the intact, live embryos, where development can be easily studied from the time of fertilization to well after functional neural circuits form.They focused on the visual system because it’s an accessible and well-established system known to depend on fatty acids for proper growth and utility.last_img read more

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Morale Boosting Bags Donated To Assisted Living Homes

first_imgFrom left, David Hampton, Lisa Duran, Tim Trujillo and James Kershner deliver 44 morale boosting bags from the senior centers to Aspen Ridge, as part of a goal to donate a bag to every senior in assisted living in the community. This delivery marks 100 bags thanks to the support of the community donating spare change in honor of local resident George Best’s 100th birthday. The bags contain treats, snacks, notes and artwork including hand painted rocks from children and adults in the community. Photo by Bernadette Lauritzen Hand painted rocks from the community were placed in every gift bag, Photo by Bernadette Lauritzenlast_img

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