CAWA to Install 2012 Officers During Industry Week

first_imgRANCHO CORDOVA, Calif. — At its annual meeting to kick off this year’s Industry Week in Las Vegas on Oct. 30, the California/Nevada/Arizona Automotive Wholesalers Association (CAWA) will install its slate of officers for the 2012 term.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement The following individuals will serve as officers for the 2012 term: • Chair of the Board – Steve Sharp, WORLDPAC • Vice Chair of the Board – Ed Jimenez,  Riebe’s Auto Parts • Treasurer – Ron Cannon, Charleston Auto Parts • Secretary –  Ron Aparicio, Walker Products • Immediate Past Chair of the Board – Mary Davis, NGK Spark Plugs (U.S.A.) Inc.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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Luján Honors Distinguished Vietnam War Veteran

first_imgAfter returning from service, Trujillo became an active member of the Rio Costilla and Taos community, helping fellow veterans as an advocate. Trujillo is a retired member of the Rio Costilla Cooperative Livestock. He has one daughter and one grandson. At a ceremony Monday in Taos, Luján presented Louis Trujillo with the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin to thank and honor Trujillo for his service to the country. In March 1968, Trujillo was wounded while traveling with his army personnel carrier when it was hit by a land mine. He was subsequently awarded a Purple Heart for his bravery and service, in addition to receiving the Bronze Star and Combat Infantry Badge.   Monday’s pinning ceremony was part of a national effort to honor Vietnam-era veteran military service members who were on active duty between Nov. 1, 1955, and May 15, 1975. Commemorative partners have helped communities publicly and individually thank 2.3 million Vietnam Veterans and their families through more than 15,000 ceremonies. “Louis Trujillo is a valued community member whose sacrifice to our country has earned him the Purple Heart award, the Bronze Star, and a Combat Infantry Badge. I was honored to thank him for his service and sacrifice with the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin,” Luján said. “Louis has spent his life serving others, and I was glad to thank him for his honorable military service.” CONGRESSIONAL News: Trujillo was born in Rio Costilla, New Mexico, Aug. 19, 1944. After enlisting, Trujillo served in the U.S. Army 9th Infinity Division. More than 11,000 local, state and national organizations have partnered with the United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration to honor the 6.4 million living Vietnam veterans. TAOS ― U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.), the U.S. House Assistant Speaker, presented a local Vietnam War veteran with the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin – a commendation of the nation’s lasting thanks to U.S. military veterans who served during the Vietnam War.last_img read more

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Posts From The Road: Loneliest Road In America

first_imgNevada Highway 50 is known as‘The Loneliest Road in America’. The road spans just over 400 miles across the state but travelers pass through only six towns. Three of those towns are located near the California border leaving only three small towns between Fallon, Nev. and the eastern border of Nevada, a distance of over 300 miles. Drivers travel more than 17 mountain ranges on the drive making it fell like a roller coaster with miles of straight road between passes. The route of the road follows the same path as the Pony Express during in the 1860s. While some may not like traveling such a highway, I have driven the highway multiple times and find the road and the people living in these small towns very interesting. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comEly, Nev. was founded in the 1800s and based on the mining industry. While nearby Connors Pass, elevation 7,729, is the highest elevation point on Highway 50 in Nevada, Ely sits at about 6,500 feet and is home to more than 4,000 people today. Mining and tourism provide are the largest source of income. Shown is a view of main street in Ely. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.com A lone trucker heads to the open valley below after topping a mountain pass on Highway 50. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comEureka is a small town of only a few hundred people, it is a welcome stop when traveling Nevada Highway 50. The town does offer basic needs of travelers passing through. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comShown is one of many stretches of Highway 50 between mountain passes that runs straight as an arrow. The lack of traffic, human presence, and very little vegetation are reasons the highway is know as‘The Loneliest Road in America’. Photo by Gary WarrenAustin, Nev. is the smallest of the lonely towns with a population of less than 200. Shown is a building in Austin that houses an antique shop on main street. Residents of Austin travel more than 100 miles to Fallon, Nev. for groceries. Photo by Gary Warren/ladailypost.comEditor’s note: Longtime Los Alamos photographer Gary Warren and his wife Marilyn are traveling around the country and he shares his photographs, which appear in the ‘Posts from the Road’ series published in the Sunday edition of the Los Alamos Daily Post.last_img read more

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Los Alamos Firefighters Assist Hikers On Deer Trap Mesa

first_imgScene this evening of Los Alamos Firefighters and EMTs responding to a couple of hikers in need of help getting out of Deer Trap Mesa near the trailhead. Initial reports indicate there are no serious injuries. Deer Trap Mesa extends east from Barranca Mesa and is named for a game pit found close to the start of the trail. The mesa is a natural area with fragile soil and it is not an appropriate spot for bicycles or horses. Its relative isolation makes it an attractive location for wildlife viewing, studying wildflowers and simply enjoying the view. Walking is easy, except for a short section of rock stairs near the trailhead. Courtesy photolast_img

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Morale Boosting Bags Donated To Assisted Living Homes

first_imgFrom left, David Hampton, Lisa Duran, Tim Trujillo and James Kershner deliver 44 morale boosting bags from the senior centers to Aspen Ridge, as part of a goal to donate a bag to every senior in assisted living in the community. This delivery marks 100 bags thanks to the support of the community donating spare change in honor of local resident George Best’s 100th birthday. The bags contain treats, snacks, notes and artwork including hand painted rocks from children and adults in the community. Photo by Bernadette Lauritzen Hand painted rocks from the community were placed in every gift bag, Photo by Bernadette Lauritzenlast_img

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Daily Postcard: Chipmunk On Barranca Mesa

first_imgDaily Postcard: A chipmunk is spotted nibbling food recently on Barranca Mesa. Photo by Selvi Viswanathanlast_img

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Stanhope sells 25% shareholding

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British Land to spec ‘Cheese Grater’

first_imgAdmitting the coming year would be ‘challenging’, chief executive Stephen Hester, is taking a £286m punt that the City market for office rentals has four years left to run. Announcing a 13% rise in British Land’s underlying trading pretax profits to £257m, Hester said: ‘Will 2011 be a great year? It is impossible to tell. There could be risks from supply. But the risks are always on our side in the long term . . . I’m not saying the market will be great in 2011, but our building will be the best available in that year. Our job is to know how to add value.’last_img

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Allied London puts XYZ up for sale after run of lettings

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Rural Midwest hospitals struggling to handle virus surge

first_imgRural Midwest hospitals struggling to handle virus surge October 17, 2020 5:38 PM By STEPHEN GROVESAssociated Press Posted: October 17, 2020 5:38 PM Updated: October 17, 2020 5:56 PM Thin resources and high death rates have plagued other small communities. Blair Tomsheck, interim director of the health department in Toole County, Montana, worried that the region’s small hospitals would need to start caring for serious COVID-19 patients after cases spiked to the nation’s highest per capita. One out of every 28 people in the county has tested positive in the last two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins researchers.“It’s very, very challenging when your resources are poor — living in a small, rural county,” she said.Infections can also spread quickly in places like Toole County, where most everyone shops at the same grocery store, attends the same school or worships at a handful of churches.“The Sunday family dinners are killing us,” Tomsheck said.Even as outbreaks threaten to spiral out of control, doctors and health officials said they are struggling to convince people of the seriousness of a virus that took months to arrive in force. Konitzer warned that the uncontrolled spread of infections has overwhelmed the county’s health systems.“I’m just waiting to see if our community can change our behavior,” she said. “Otherwise, I don’t see the end in sight.—-This story has been corrected to fix the spelling of Konitzer in one instance.FacebookPinterestTwitterLinkedinTop Videos WESSINGTON SPRINGS, S.D. (AP) — Rural Jerauld County in South Dakota didn’t see a single case of the coronavirus for more than two months stretching from June to August. But over the last two weeks, its rate of new cases per person soared to one of the highest in the nation.“All of a sudden it hit, and as it does, it just exploded,” said Dr. Tom Dean, one of just three doctors who work in the county.As the brunt of the virus has blown into the Upper Midwest and northern Plains, the severity of outbreaks in rural communities has come into focus. Doctors and health officials in small towns worry that infections may overwhelm communities with limited medical resources. And many say they are still running up against attitudes on wearing masks that have hardened along political lines and a false notion that rural areas are immune to widespread infections. In Wisconsin, conservative groups have sued over Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ mask mandate.Whether the requirement survives doesn’t matter to Jody Bierhals, a resident of Gillett who doubts the efficacy of wearing a mask. Her home county of Oconto, which stretches from the northern border of Green Bay into forests and farmland, has the state’s second-highest growth in coronavirus cases per person.Bierhals, a single mother with three kids, is more worried about the drop in business at her small salon. The region depends on tourists, but many have stayed away during the pandemic.“Do I want to keep the water on, or do I want to be able to put food on the table?” she asked. “It’s a difficult situation.”Bierhals said she thought the virus couldn’t be stopped and it would be best to let it run its course. But local attitudes like that have left the county’s health officer, Debra Konitzer, desperate. Dean took to writing a column in the local weekly newspaper, the True Dakotan, to offer his guidance. In recent weeks, he’s watched as one in roughly every 37 people in his county has tested positive for the virus.It ripped through the nursing home in Wessington Springs where both his parents lived, killing his father. The community’s six deaths may appear minimal compared with thousands who have died in cities, but they have propelled the county of about 2,000 people to a death rate roughly four times higher than the nationwide rate.Rural counties across Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana sit among the top in the nation for new cases per capita over the last two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins University researchers. Overall, the nation topped 8 million confirmed coronavirus cases in the university’s count on Friday; the true number of infections is believed to be much higher because many people have not been tested.In counties with just a few thousand people, the number of cases per capita can soar with even a small outbreak — and the toll hits close to home in tight-knit towns.“One or two people with infections can really cause a large impact when you have one grocery store or gas station,” said Misty Rudebusch, the medical director at a network of rural health clinics in South Dakota called Horizon Health Care. “There is such a ripple effect.” By Doctor Report Wessington Springs is a hub for the generations of farmers and ranchers that work the surrounding land. Residents send their children to the same schoolhouse they attended and have preserved cultural offerings like a Shakespeare garden and opera house.They trust Dean, who for 42 years has tended to everything from broken bones to high blood pressure. When a patient needs a higher level of care, the family physician usually depends on a transfer to a hospital 130 miles (209 kilometers) away.As cases surge, hospitals in rural communities are having trouble finding beds. A recent request to transfer a “not desperately ill, but pretty” sick COVID-19 patient was denied for several days, until the patient’s condition had worsened, Dean said.“We’re proud of what we got, but it’s been a struggle,” he said of the 16-bed hospital.The outbreak that killed Dean’s dad forced Wessington Springs’ only nursing home to put out a statewide request for nurses. Sponsored Content How Meghan Markle Looks Without Makeup Is Tough To Handle “It’s kind of like getting a blizzard warning and then the blizzard doesn’t hit that week, so then the next time, people say they are not going to worry about it,” said Kathleen Taylor, a 67-year-old author who lives in Redfield, South Dakota.In swaths of the country decorated by flags supporting President Donald Trump, people took their cues on wearing masks from his often-cavalier attitude towards the virus. Dean draws a direct connection between Trump’s approach and the lack of precautions in his town of 956 people.“There’s the foolish idea that mask-wearing or refusal is some kind of a political statement,” Dean said. “It has seriously interfered with our ability to get it under control.”Even amid the surge, Republican governors in the region have been reluctant to act. North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum said recently, “We are caught in the middle of a COVID storm” as he raised advisory risk levels in counties across the state. But he has refused to issue a mask mandate.South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, who has carved out a reputation among conservatives by foregoing lockdowns, blamed the surge in cases on testing increases, even though the state has had the highest positivity rate in the nation over the last two weeks, according to the COVID Tracking Project. Positivity rates are an indication of how widespread infections are.last_img read more

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